A Byrd In the Lab

Maybe Buck and McCarver knew something we didn’t when they kept referring to Paul Byrd as "crafty."

23 comments… add one
  • I would like to know if anyone knows for sure exactly what HGH does. I read somewhere recently that it does not increase muscle mass like steroids, but instead aids in injury recovery. Are there deleterious long term effects? If not, and it does help athletes recover from injury, is it really a terrible thing if, say, it is used to recover from serious injury or surgery, provided it is used only while the player is inactive?

    Tom sf October 21, 2007, 10:20 am
  • Byrd’s comments in that article are so calculated, his “opposition” to steroids (clearly he doesn’t think of HGH as being in the same ballpark), his comment that he has always competed “within the rules of the game”.
    Skunk.

    SF October 21, 2007, 10:26 am
  • he’s obviously a byrdbrain
    so how does he rationalize that one banned substance isn’t as bad as another banned substance…let me guess, a little byrd told him…

    dc October 21, 2007, 11:32 am
  • There are no absolutely proven long term downsides to HGH but a number of studies have indicated that it increases the risk of cancer. Since it aids healing and muclse developmenet by increasing the production of new cells, it vaguely makes sense to me that it could also increase the production of cancer cells. But I’m no medical researcher.

    rootbeerfloat October 21, 2007, 12:25 pm
  • Apparently the HGH was for a prescribed medical condition by a doctor, exactly what hormonal deficiency he didn’t say. If it’s legit, I don’t have a problem with that, that’s what the drugs were created for.
    However, I’m a little skeeved by him paying for the HGH with his credit card- shouldn’t the insurance company cover it if it’s an authentic medical necessity?

    no sleep til brooklyn SF October 21, 2007, 2:58 pm
  • Much of the HGH was prescribed by his dentist, not a doctor. Why his dentist?

    SF October 21, 2007, 3:00 pm
  • Oh I didn’t know it was from a dentist- that’s a whole new ball of wax! wtf does a dentist know about hormonal imbalances?

    no sleep til brooklyn SF October 21, 2007, 3:07 pm
  • from SI:
    “Citing an anonymous law enforcement source, the Chronicle said two of the prescriptions Byrd used to buy the growth hormone were written by a Florida dentist. The dentist’s license was suspended in 2003 for fraud and incompetence. Byrd was slowed by an elbow injury in 2003, and records show he made six purchases of HGH.”

    SF October 21, 2007, 3:11 pm
  • eek! That’s a lot different than the shit he was selling in the msnbc article.
    “The Indians, my coaches and MLB have known that I have had a pituitary gland issue for some time and have assisted me in getting blood tests in different states. I am currently working with an endocrinologist and will have another MRI on my head after the season to make sure that the tumor hasn’t grown.”
    http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21405615/

    no sleep til brooklyn SF October 21, 2007, 3:17 pm
  • > Why his dentist?
    Difficulty masticating tough pieces of meat?

    attackgerbil October 21, 2007, 3:20 pm
  • I’m highly suspicious of the timing of this story-Lance Williams and Mark Fainaru-Wada (Game of Shadows) have no doubt known about this for a while. Seems like more than mere coincidence that they break the story the day of the deciding game of the ALCS. Outrageous.

    Andrews October 21, 2007, 4:15 pm
  • Williams and Fainaru-Wada may prove that the pen is mightier than the PED.
    The kind of distraction this story will likely cause could cost the Indians the pennant. If Byrd’s explanation proves true, then it seems a tragedy to penalize he and his teamates right before one of the most important games of their lives. Why not do the responsible thing and wait until after the WS to break this story?

    Andrews October 21, 2007, 4:26 pm
  • I just don’t see how this affects tonight’s game. Were Byrd pitching, it might be something.
    One could argue that this gives the Indians motivation as victims, puts a big chip on their shoulders.
    I am 99.9% certain this story has no impact on the game tonight, or rather has as much impact as those who want to manufacture excuses choose.

    SF October 21, 2007, 5:10 pm
  • Paul Byrd said that MLB knows, the Indians know and everyone knows that he has a pituitary gland problem and a tumor. He wouldn’t be dumb enough to say MLB knew if they legitimately didn’t know and he knew they didn’t know. It sounds an awful lot to me like the media saw that this guy received HGH and quickly jumped on it as though he was using it illegally. If MLB knows, I’m not buying that this guy cheated. I know what HGH does, I’m not denying that he used it. I’m just denying this whole conspiracy bullsh*t every time something happens. He’s got a pretty good alibi and this whole steroid investigation is complete sh*t, I really do believe he’s telling the truth and I think based on what he said, its sufficient to believe that he was telling the truth.

    Yf October 21, 2007, 5:15 pm
  • MLB knows that Byrd TOLD them he has a pituitary glad issue. How exactly does the pituitary relate to ones dental health? That would lead me to question the veracity of all his statements, most especially the ones he knows would make him sound the most innocent.

    Paul SF October 21, 2007, 6:27 pm
  • ” am 99.9% certain this story has no impact on the game tonight, or rather has as much impact as those who want to manufacture excuses choose.”
    Just how are you 99.9 percent sure?
    Yet again,SF, because you think so highly of your own opinion, you don’t seem to be able to separate it from fact, which makes you come across as pompous and pedantic.

    Andrews October 21, 2007, 7:06 pm
  • I said 99.9% sure because there’s no way I can be 100% sure.
    I do know from your comment that you’ve already made up your mind what you think of the Byrd revelation and how it might relate to a hypothetical Sox win, Andrews. It’s transparent.

    SF October 21, 2007, 7:15 pm
  • “The Indians, my coaches and MLB have known that I have had a pituitary gland issue for some time…”
    “…he has always competed “within the rules of the game.”
    Byrd gives ME a pituitary gland condition.
    Listening to him and other so-called rule abiding athletes has conditioned me to go
    Ptooooie!

    Brian October 21, 2007, 7:34 pm
  • ” I said 99.9% sure because there’s no way I can be 100% sure”
    That’s enlightening.
    These players aren’t robots; it’s within reason that the story might distract them enough to affect their play. Why can’t you admit that it’s a possibility?
    “you’ve already made up your mind what you think of the Byrd revelation and how it might relate to a hypothetical Sox win”
    You’re a mindreader too? Wow.
    I think the sox would have won with or without this, based on their offense clicking, and the poor performance of Cleveland’s bullpen of late.
    I’m 99.9 percent sure if the situation were reversed, and the story had been about a sox player, you would no doubt have a different take on the matter.

    Andrews October 21, 2007, 7:37 pm
  • ” I said 99.9% sure because there’s no way I can be 100% sure”
    That’s enlightening.

    This was meant in jest. I was reminded of a placard (one of those silly businessperson desk objects) that says “the only time I was wrong was the time I thought I was wrong”.
    I obviously have no idea whether or not there will be any impact on this game, Andrews, not 1%, no 99.9%. But there’s no way to know, and the idea that the story will have any impact on the game is speculative, and is more likely to be a post-haste applique analysis than anything else. I just don’t see how Grady Sizemore’s play could possibly be affected by this, nor Jake Westbrook’s, nor Daisuke’s, nor anyone’s but, perhaps, Byrd’s.

    SF October 21, 2007, 7:43 pm
  • Or, to put it more clearly, I could see this used as motivation (“us against the world”) or as detrimental (the “distraction” excuse). I don’t know how one can possibly measure this, though, other than to wait to hear the excuses later on.

    SF October 21, 2007, 7:46 pm
  • I’m not an athlete, as you know, but I consider what I do similar in that I have to perform,under pressure, in the moment. As an analogy: A concert is being recorded live for a cd on a major label – before the gig, a bandmate announces that he has a terminal disease. I can tell you that, no matter how much I tried to clear my mind, my performance would be adversly affected. It’s happened. While we’ll never know to what degree, I don’t think you can just throw out the possibility that something similar will happen tonight.
    I seem to remember a few teams going on prolonged losing streaks after the steroid suspension of a team member.
    All I’m trying to say is that the timing of this article sucks.

    Andrews October 21, 2007, 8:05 pm
  • I don’t think you can just throw out the possibility that something similar will happen tonight
    I’m not. I also think the “let’s do it for Johnny” mentality could also apply. It’s impossible to know how it might affect them, to assume it will be negative is an error, in my opinion. Assuming the opposite, as well.

    SF October 21, 2007, 8:08 pm

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