A-Rod: “I am Very Sorry and Deeply Regretful”

According to ESPN.com, Alex Rodriguez sat down with Peter Gammons and came clean regarding his use of PED's.  The interview will air tonight during the 6 PM SportsCenter.  In the interview Alex Rodriguez admits that he took PED's during a three year period in Texas.  "When I arrived in Texas in 2001, I felt an enormous amount of
pressure, felt all the weight of the world on top of me to perform, and
perform at a high level every day," Rodriguez told Gammons.  He also went on to say "I did take a banned substance. For that, I am very sorry and deeply regretful."  

90 comments… add one

  • Wow.
    Good for him for owning up, I guess.
    What an idiot. It’s a good thing he’s never performed in any kind of pressure-packed playoff situation that could cause all of us to say “see, that’s the reason the guy hits in the clutch so well”. ha.
    I’m so unsurprised that he was on them, but really surprised that he took the Pettitte route when it could have been so easy to deny to the end.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:19 pm
  • Sorry, but this annoys me.
    He didn’t own up to anything, he was caught red handed, he really had no choice. I appreciate that he didn’t try to deny it, I guess.

    LocklandSF February 9, 2009, 3:23 pm
  • That must have been some clubhouse in Texas? That’s just crazy the number of guys who used allegedly or otherwise.
    I guess he went the right route, I just hope he can focus on playing baseball and help this team win. In the end that’s all I care about. I wrote him off as a favorite awhile ago. Just hit, play defense and try to stay out of the papers for the rest of the season and all will be fine.
    The one problem I see down the road is that he is saying he knew he failed, but not for what drug and that after hearing the initial results he never heard anything else about it. I am sure something will come out down the road to the contrary, after all this is A-Rod.

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 3:27 pm
  • What didn’t he own up to Lock?

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 3:29 pm
  • I don’t see any honor in what he did, because he was backed into a corner and was forced to do so. Clemens has shown what happens when you go down the denial road, and it just wouldn’t work.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 3:30 pm
  • That’s all I mean, Lockland.
    Clearly, he would have never owned up to anything had he not been outed. Despite the momentary lapses of intelligence at all, he’s not stupid and neither are his handlers. Clearly he’s still lying about certain things, but at least he did admit to his crime.
    Couple things, however:
    Gammons made it very easy on him, which I would assume is why he took the interview in the first place. Why wouldn’t Gammons ask where the hell the drugs came from? People are going to start digging hard here.
    The idea that A-Rod would put something in his body, having no known knowledge of what it was, is downright stupid. He knew exactly what it was, and what it would do for him.
    A person with any inkling of common sense has to question his honest with regards to his Yankee years as well as his admitted Texas years.
    And it’s impossible that the CEO of the MLPA called him and said “you may or may not have tested positive”…That’s just the stupidest lie I’ve ever heard.
    “I denied Katie Couric because I wasn’t aware I failed the test, so I didn’t think that what I took was illegal or bad for me”
    You have got to be kidding me, ARod. Be serious here. Those are blatant lies, buddy.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:34 pm
  • I am sure something will come out down the road to the contrary, after all this is A-Rod.
    Yup, me too. Still, what could come out? He didn’t fail in 2004 or since.
    Maybe a former dealer? But then they would have to prove they were after 2004.
    What’s interesting to me, is the period he talks about is when the photos start to show added bulk, especially in his chest. Since then he’s much slimmer, and especially in 2006.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 3:34 pm
  • The AP story.
    “It was such a loosey-goosey era. I’m guilty for a lot of things. I’m guilty for being negligent, naive, not asking all the right questions,” Rodriguez said. “And to be quite honest, I don’t know exactly what substance I was guilty of using.”
    I’m sorry, but that’s crap. This is the Barry Bonds defense, and it doesn’t wash. The “gym rat,” who foregoes pizza for chicken and veggies because he’s so concerned about his body decides to inject himself with a chemical substance and he doesn’t even know what it is? It sounded stupid when Bonds and numerous others tried to play that card, and it sounds stupid now. It’s completely unbelievable.
    A-Rod’s obviously in a lose-lose situation. If he fesses up, he did it because he was outed and has no other choice. If he denies it, he’s a Clemens-esque fraud who continues to lie about his usage. I don’t know if there’s a way out of it — or even if there should be — but obviously A-Rod took the road most likely to lead there. It may not have been enough anyway, but statements like the one above just boggle my mind. Not only does he rack up a list of things he did “wrong” that just don’t sound so bad after all (he just didn’t ask enough questions! Who among us hasn’t asked enough questions?), but he pleads ignorance when every other aspect of his life and career show he knew exactly what he was doing.

    Paul SF February 9, 2009, 3:35 pm
  • I can’t believe for one second that any player is capable of performing at the same or a BETTER level after he comes OFF the steroids.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:35 pm
  • Sorry, Paul. We crossed posted there on the same points.
    Someone is going to come out on this one, and write a book or get paid for a huge interview with someone sticking A-Rod on more of a stage than he’s put himself on now.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:37 pm
  • I know it’s a fact that A-Rod hasn’t failed any tests since 2003, but why would Orza feel the need to warn him in 2004 if he didn’t have a pretty good idea who was juicing and who wasn’t?
    Maybe Orza was just going off the 2003 results — [edit, after thinking more about this:] in fact he probably was, so scratch that point. :-P

    Paul SF February 9, 2009, 3:40 pm
  • I don’t think I was clear Rob, what I was saying was: Alex is stating that he got word that he failed in 2003. He was never told what he failed for, meaning which drug. He is also claiming he never heard anything else about this after that initial notice of failure. That’s what I am referring to. Not that he used more than just that time, but that it wasn’t spoken about with Selig or Orza or whomever. That part I don’t believe and could see some more info coming out down the road.

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 3:40 pm
  • I don’t see any honor in what he did, because he was backed into a corner and was forced to do so.
    Not really. He was anonymously named on a list that was supposed to be destroyed. I understand that named in the media is equivalent for guilty as charged, but there was plenty of wiggle room for a talented lawyer. A-Rod did the media savvy “right” thing, but legally he certainly didn’t have to. He simply could have denied it (a test from five years ago, an list of who else?, who are these sources violating my rights?) then said: “My current performance proves otherwise.”
    Clemens is very different. The guy he slandered had physical evidence and, it seems, DNA.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 3:41 pm
  • Almost everything I have read on this subject tells me that the chemists have always remained ahead of the tests, if you can afford it.

    LocklandSF February 9, 2009, 3:41 pm
  • I’m sorry, but that’s crap.
    Ah, the Rorschach that is A-Rod.
    I take him to mean that he knew he was taking steroids, and what they would do, just that he didn’t knwo the specific names.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 3:42 pm
  • Mixed feelings about this pseudo-apology.
    “To be quite honest, I don’t know exactly what substance I was guilty of using,” Rodriguez said.
    I believe him in this part. As mentioned above, it is very easy to see that the drug culture was pervasive in the Rangers’ locker room, if not throughout the game, and I think it is plausible that he was aligned with the “everybody’s doin’ it”* mentality, using based on the anecdotes of other players, not really concerning himself with exactly what “it” was, as in by actual name.
    This part sucks: “at the time, I wasn’t being truthful with myself. How could I be truthful with Katie Couric or CBS?”
    “I wasn’t being truthful with myself..” This self-actualization bullshit pisses me off, and more than a bit. How does one be truthful? By telling the truth: “First, I broke the law of the land by buying the stuff. Then I cheated by the rules of baseball by using the stuff.” Instead, he lied about each when asked. Frankly, I’m not overwhelmed with remorse by the act or the lie, but I’m surprised how annoyed I am with the apology. Whatever, though. I have not checked, but I would wager that the statute of limitations regarding prosecution for the procurement of the illicit substance(s) has expired. Otherwise, counsel would have had him keep quiet.
    *For some odd reason this quote has been rattling in my head: This game is just for bangers. – Maybe you’re right. Maybe this game is just for bangers. But everybody’s doin it. If everybody’s doin it, there’s a lot a guys doin it. Lot a guys doin it, then only one can….be the best.

    attackgerbil February 9, 2009, 3:43 pm
  • Almost everything I have read on this subject tells me that the chemists have always remained ahead of the tests, if you can afford it…
    yep. One is always playing catch up to another. You can’t predict the next big drug; the only way to know what will be the next big performance enhancer is to be the guy to create it.
    And it’s normally bio-chemists, not chemists. Sorry to nit-pick.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:44 pm
  • There is no way to know how long after Texas, if at all he stopped using Steroids or any PED’s. You cannot say well his numbers are _____…he left the launching pad that is the ballpark at Arlington, so of course his HR numbers will drop. Now was it a new ball park or was it the discontinuing of the PED’s. Who knows. I don’t care to know either. For me it’s done and over with. He was outed, he said he did it, now let’s play ball. I don’t support him, nor do I think he’s “Honorable” but I want the Yankees to win and without a focused Alex they have no shot. Rock meet hard place.

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 3:47 pm
  • Interesting question over on NYYFans
    To Yankee fans, do you want the entire list revealed, hoping that other big names will be on it to take the spotlight off of the Yankees. Or… Do you want it to remain sealed, just in case there are more big Yankee names on it?

    LocklandSF February 9, 2009, 3:47 pm
  • That part I don’t believe and could see some more info coming out down the road.
    I see, thanks. I’m not sure about that either though. Orza and Selig have their own reputations to protect and the only way they would have talked to A-Rod is in person.
    As I think about the Roberts story, the only way three players could confirm that Orza told A-Rod is if A-Rod himself was bragging (not too hard to imagine). So I could imagine those players coming forward and saying “Wait a second, A-Rod told me he was using in 2004 and that he couldn’t get caught because of Orza”. That’s how I could see this blowing up more, any ways.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 3:48 pm
  • I take him to mean that he knew he was taking steroids, and what they would do, just that he didn’t knwo the specific names.
    So do I. I just find it very hard to believe he didn’t know the name and what it would do, particularly given that the side effects to steroids are and have seeimingly always been fairly well known. Maybe Canseco or whoever told him, “Try this, it works great, hard to detect and doesn’t have major side effects,” and he took them at their word. But I doubt it. Something tells me athletes at his level make sure they know what they’re putting in their bodies — probably because I do that, and I’m not anywhere close to being an athlete.

    Paul SF February 9, 2009, 3:48 pm
  • Not really. He was anonymously named on a list that was supposed to be destroyed. I understand that named in the media is equivalent for guilty as charged, but there was plenty of wiggle room for a talented lawyer.
    We’re not talking legality here, we’re talking about his public image. The only route he had was to fess up to a certain degree. He was backed into a corner in that way, and the ONLY thing he could do to salvage his image was to confess.
    I only mentioned Clemens to show that fighting it wouldn’t have done any good, no matter what amount of evidence exists. Hell, Bonds has never tested positive for anything but the perception is that he has taken performance enhancers, and so his image is destroyed.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 3:48 pm
  • So, what you’re saying is that the moniker is staying “John-YF”?
    :))
    And, I totally agree.
    In other news, Tiger Woods just had a son.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:49 pm
  • About the list – I care more about the sport than some laundry.
    The full list please.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 3:50 pm
  • I would like to see the rest of the list as well. No matter who is on it.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 3:52 pm
  • Yeah, give us 100% please. I know that there are probably Sox players on it, but I really feel like we need full disclosure at this point before we can start moving forward.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 3:53 pm
  • The list coming out is a certainty. So might as well rip the band aid off than one four-days-of-hysteria revelation at a time. If for no other reason than we’ve been so conditioned now to expect the work, we will probably be surprised by the lack of newsworthiness contained on the rest of the list (a la the Mitchell Report).

    Paul SF February 9, 2009, 3:54 pm
  • expect the WORST

    Paul SF February 9, 2009, 3:54 pm
  • Something tells me athletes at his level make sure they know what they’re putting in their bodies — probably because I do that, and I’m not anywhere close to being an athlete.
    They get injections all the time. I doubt they know or care the specific name brands. But they care about the effects. Same deal here. He ended up with a brand that wasn’t going to get him much bigger. That’s probably because he pushed for it knowing he couldn’t play SS if he were any bigger.
    He was backed into a corner in that way, and the ONLY thing he could do to salvage his image was to confess.
    Again, not really. There was alot of wiggle room, so much so that we all wondered how he would handle it. Few could have predicted definitively he would come out today with a confession.
    And he has a guaranteed contract for alot of money. His endorsements could have taken a hit, but they’re a small fraction of his yearly salary. As for image, the dude just got divorced after getting caught with a buff stripper and then started banging Madonna. I don’t think he’s super concerned with his image.
    The reason he came out now is that he basically controls the story again. It’s PR 101, but he didn’t HAVE to.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 3:57 pm
  • > do you want the entire list revealed
    Sure.
    > hoping that other big names will be on it to take the spotlight off of the Yankees
    Nope.
    > Do you want it to remain sealed, just in case there are more big Yankee names on it?
    When I was about eight years old, my grandmother was setting about making my sister and me French toast for breakfast. She pulled a dozen eggs from the icebox — love that term — and while walking to the kitchen counter, dropped the carton of eggs. They all broke on the floor, which caused her to cry (money was tight) but shortly thereafter happened to find one unbroken egg that fortunately landed in the pocket of her housecoat which made her exceedingly grateful.
    Wait. What? That story has nothing to do with baseball. I just like French toast. Break the eggs.

    attackgerbil February 9, 2009, 3:58 pm
  • There was no wiggle room in the court of public opinion, he had to admit it.

    LocklandSF February 9, 2009, 3:59 pm
  • I hope your right Paul, but I was listening to Kim Jones this morning and she thinks that it will not come out. Now, I don’t know how reputable she is in the industry but she comes across as a pretty smart, un-homer-ish type of reporter (unlike MK). She just thinks there is no good to be had for either side if the remainder of the list is made public. The test results were supposed to be anonymous, they were supposed to be destroyed and then they were only supposed to be used for the BALCO investigation, they failed on all accounts. I hope you’re right, because I want to know…I think. (Unless Jeter is on the list then I don’t want to know. Can we work that out 1st?)

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 4:01 pm
  • There was no wiggle room in the court of public opinion, he had to admit it.
    Sorry, but I’m thinking this is just a convenient retort to some cognitive dissonance:
    a) A-Rod did something right.
    or
    b) A-Rod did what he had to do.
    No surprise some would sooner say (b) than admit (a)!
    The fact is A-Rod could have denied, said he had no idea how he got on that list (based on anonymous reports), then hit another 350 homers over the next 9 years. That last bit would have done wonders for his baseball image if you believe that the current testing is adequate and no other scandals occur.
    Look at this way: Now he’s left no doubt. Any other way and there would have been.
    That’s a courageous decision.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 4:07 pm
  • Orza just flat out denied that he ever spoke to A-Rod about any test or any result.

    Brad February 9, 2009, 4:09 pm
  • The reason he came out now is that he basically controls the story again. It’s PR 101, but he didn’t HAVE to.
    That’s essentially what I’m saying. He obviously had other options, but this was far-and-away the route to take. Also, my main point is that it’s not honorable because he’s doing it after he got caught, and after lying about it repeatedly. If he (or anyone else) were to come out and voluntarily admit using a drug they knew nothing about, I would have a huge amount of respect for them. Doing it after the fact means nothing.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 4:10 pm
  • Wait, first you said that it’s PR 101, and now you’re saying it’s a courageous decision. Which is it? I would say those two statements are mutually exclusive.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 4:15 pm
  • Doing it after the fact means nothing.
    That’s extreme. It means something. Something big. He’s now cast his historical lot with McGwire, Clemens, and Bonds when he had plenty of room to wiggle free – most especially the rest of his career.
    What interesting in a weird way is that he’s now going to be making the argument, over the rest of his career, for why the PED Era really shouldn’t matter as a moral designation.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 4:16 pm
  • I would say those two statements are mutually exclusive.
    Clemens (and McGwire) failed PR 101 because he wasn’t courageous. A-Rod passed because he was (or perhaps because he knows he has another nine years to cememnt his reputation).
    Just because it was the most obvious PR move, doesn’t mean he had to.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 4:19 pm
  • He’s now cast his historical lot with McGwire, Clemens, and Bonds when he had plenty of room to wiggle free – most especially the rest of his career.
    None of the players you mentioned have admitted to using performance enhancing drugs.
    ARod is like a little boy stealing cookies from the cookie jar. His mom asks him if he did it, and he denies it, and then once faced with the evidence the little boy apologizes. Does that apology really mean anything? Saying “he could have wiggled out of it” is unrealistic, especially if there’s more evidence we have yet to see.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 4:25 pm
  • Ath, you and I usually agree on things like this but I think you are being a little hard on him. So you are saying you wanted him to come out and come clean prior to any information leaking out? I don’t know man that seems highly unlikely regardless of who it is. It’s even more difficult because he’s (A) still under contract and (B) still playing. I think that’s a lot to ask of anyone just to come out mid-career and own up to it.

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 4:33 pm
  • Just because it was the most obvious PR move, doesn’t mean he had to.
    I think you’re taking my statement “he had to admit to it” a bit too literally. I’m saying pretty much exactly what you’re saying: that admitting to the steroid use (the Pettitte Method) was a far more viable option than a long process of denial lawsuits (the Clemens Method). So much so that it was an easy choice to make. Choosing the “PR 101″ move is far from courageous, especially when the alternative involves dragging the issue out for several years.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 4:34 pm
  • I’m just saying that his admission today means nothing to me. I think the comment I was replying directly to was Brad’s, when he said “Good for him for owning up, I guess.” I don’t feel any better or worse for him now that he has admitted to it and apologized, because I feel that doing it once you get caught is a little disingenuous.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 4:36 pm
  • None of the players you mentioned have admitted to using performance enhancing drugs.
    Sure, but since you’re the one pushing the PR angle, does that distinction really matter?
    ARod is like a little boy stealing cookies from the cookie jar.
    Sure, if that little boy had some great historical claim to truth-telling. So it’s like Abe Lincoln or Jesus getting caught stealing cookies.
    Sorry, but A-Rod had more to lose by admitting the truth than by denying it. He chose the path of least PR resistance, but that doesn’t make it any easier.
    I’m still utterly fascinated by how this decision to come clean reverberates through the history of the game. In a weird way, I think he’s “saved” Bonds and Clemens and McGwire.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 4:41 pm
  • One thing is for sure, no opposing fans will let him live this down for the rest of his playing days.
    He’s going to have to grow some pretty thick skin quick, which doesn’t seem to be a strong personality trait for him.
    It’s going to be 10 times worse than ever before.

    LocklandSF February 9, 2009, 4:41 pm
  • Everything Alex says seems disingenuous. I don’t forgive, the thing that works for me is that now maybe he can focus on baseball and helping the Yankees win.

    John - YF February 9, 2009, 4:41 pm
  • He’s going to have to grow some pretty thick skin quick, which doesn’t seem to be a strong personality trait for him.
    Been there, done that. He’ll have a big year.
    It’s funny for me, but I can already see the wheels turning for intellectually challenged sports writers. Abraham is already trying to do that dance. Problem is, A-Rod just took back the conversation of all the moralizing from the sports writers. You have a guy that will continue to produce at a very high level for the rest of his career. I don’t see how they can hold it against him. Then, when that argument falls it’s going to be extremely hard, if not impossible, to hold it against the other generational greats who were implicated.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 4:48 pm
  • I think he admitted to using for 3 years because he probably knew that there were people in that Organization that could say he had been using there the whole time. I think by that admission it is safer to say that he probably wasn’t doing them in Seattle. Not definite but a decent logical inference.
    This will be interesting. From 2003 on he will be considered by many to have been clean. IT has been very hard to distinguish what affect, if any, PEDS has on the numbers of the game. The only agreement I’ve seen is the belief that it helped to boost the second half career numbers of great players, who might have otherwise faded out.
    ARod used PEDS during the years everyone considers the most productive years of any career. The numbers are amazing no doubt; but if Alex Rodriguez is able to say hit at or above .300 with 28-33 homeruns 4 years from now (when he will be 37) will people STILL feel that his numbers are not a true testimony to his skill level?

    walein February 9, 2009, 4:53 pm
  • I guess this all got said while I was writing it. ;)

    walein February 9, 2009, 4:55 pm
  • Can you clarify what you mean here:
    [Admitting so after-the-fact] means something. Something big. He’s now cast his historical lot with McGwire, Clemens, and Bonds when he had plenty of room to wiggle free – most especially the rest of his career.
    I’m just confused with how ARod has now “cast his historical lot” in with those players now that he has admitted to using steroids.
    Aside from that, ARod’s choice was an easy one. Admitting to it and pulling the “I didn’t know what I took” is anything but courageous, and is a FAR easier road than denial. Pettitte and Giambi both admitted to their usage and it was easy on them. Bonds and Clemens denied their usage from day one, and have been dealing with the fallout for years since.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 4:56 pm
  • The numbers are amazing no doubt; but if Alex Rodriguez is able to say hit at or above .300 with 28-33 homeruns 4 years from now (when he will be 37) will people STILL feel that his numbers are not a true testimony to his skill level?
    That’s exactly where he gives the moralizing sports writers a hard time. Their heads might explode from having to think too much AND having to resort to the newfangled stats.
    All the evidence about A-Rod’s greatness was obvious in his very first year, at age 20. Bonds has the same early career claim to greatness and he produced in a highly tested over the age year (2007).
    By golly, I believe A-Rod has just saved Barry Bonds from the sports writers. Amazing.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 4:59 pm
  • Yeah, that’s certainly true: if there’s one person who is happy more names are coming out, it’s Bonds. I bet he threw a party when the Mitchell Report came out and named Clemens.

    Atheose - SF February 9, 2009, 5:01 pm
  • I’m just confused with how ARod has now “cast his historical lot” in with those players now that he has admitted to using steroids.
    He can’t be judged separately from them. How he is judged by history is now firmly related to how they will be judged by history. His destiny is their destiny.
    Admitting to it and pulling the “I didn’t know what I took” is anything but courageous, and is a FAR easier road than denial.
    Short-term (reporting to camp, playing this season) yes. But in the long-term (HOF, place in the history of the game) that’s completely up in the air based on today’s standards (and the frothing sportswriters over the weekend). He’s now chosen to shape the debate and while he finishes his career. That’s ballsy. Pettitte and Giambi had nothing historical at-stake. It was all about their reputations and theirs alone. A-Rod was supposed to be the guy that saved baseball from itself. He still might.

    Rob February 9, 2009, 5:06 pm
  • The full list please
    Yes. Catharsis is good, though sometimes sad and painful.
    I guess A-Rod did a smart thing here. I don’t know if he did the “right” thing, or a “brave” thing, but he certainly did the smart thing. I am not a big fan of these qualified “weight of the world” lines, they smack of A-Rod somehow playing into a sense of victimization (252 million little weights, sir, who was the one who chose to sign that contract and got paid all that money?), but I am not sure they really matter all that much at this point. And “I don’t even know what I took”? Please. But he HAS admitted something that he could have been silent about, and that’s worth something. At the least, it’s cathartic. I don’t boo players, and even if I did I don’t think I’d boo Rodriguez at this point, laundry, PEDs, and all.
    He even came more “clean” than Giambi ever did, frankly.

    SF February 9, 2009, 5:33 pm
  • > saved baseball from itself
    I enjoyed that critical observation in your comment. Baseball’s gate from last year shows how little “saving” it needs. I’m remotely interested in what individual accolades may be impacted, but baseball as an institution is going to be fine, despite steroids, contracting economies, incensed professional writers, angry loners with blogs, Martian invasions….

    attackgerbil February 9, 2009, 5:45 pm
  • ARod apologized, I accept so let’s move on! Let’s Go Yankees! CLAP, CLAP…CLAP, CLAP, CLAP!!! How about CC and A.J. in the rotation, huh? Texiera at first?
    (very nervous about how this is going to effect the team, trying to change the subject…)

    krueg February 9, 2009, 6:14 pm
  • Watching this interview. A couple of notes:
    A-Rod tried to make a personal appeal to me by mentioning that he was born in Washington Heights. I must resist his pandering. He is evil!
    A-Rod likes to call Selena Roberts “this lady” a lot and his rant against her was somewhat odd.
    He says God made this happen for a reason. I’m going to disagree and say that God was too busy last week playing all sorts of games with me including setting up scenarios where I would step in dog shit two straight days.

    Nick-YF February 9, 2009, 6:26 pm
  • if your options were….
    sheffield route = flax seed, lie, lie, lie.
    clemens route = misremembered, lie, lie, lie.
    pettitte route = lie, lie, apologize with damage control.
    giambi route = lie, apologize enough to not effect his contract.
    a-rod route = lie, apologize and come almost clean.
    ….a-rods route looks like the most sincere attempt to my eyes.

    sf rod February 9, 2009, 6:47 pm
  • always love your takes nick!

    sf rod February 9, 2009, 6:50 pm
  • Rob Neyer’s take sounds like some of the posts around here — thought folks might be interested.

    stuck working (sf) February 9, 2009, 8:33 pm
  • Feh. Changing the topic for a second… saw this in comments over on banter.. Ichiro can pitch, and has a 92mph fastball.

    attackgerbil February 9, 2009, 9:39 pm
  • Neyer is right on the money. A-Rod’s claim that he didn’t know what was being put into him is just flat-out laughable. An elite athlete lets someone inject DRUGS INTO THEIR SYSTEM FOR THREE YEARS and has zero curiosity or memory of what those drugs were or what they did? Please.
    He’s still lying, even as he comes “clean”.

    SF February 9, 2009, 9:48 pm
  • A-Rod Translation: “I am very sorry I got caught and deeply regretful I got caught.”

    Hudson February 9, 2009, 10:28 pm
  • As a Yanksfan, I really don’t care if they release the full list or not. What’s the best-case scenario? I find out lots of other players on rival teams were also using? Sorry, but I already know that.
    We know there are 103 other players on there, and those are only the ones that tested positive, which for various reasons stated upthread (ability of chemists and athletes to stay ahead of the tests, false negatives, guys who stopped using because they knew the tests were coming, etc.) is only a fraction of the real number of players users who have ever consumed a PED. Anybody who thinks it wasn’t n enormous part of the baseball culture of the time (and maybe still) is kidding themselves. The naming and shaming is pointless at best, hypocritical and vindictive at worst.

    Mark - YF February 9, 2009, 11:04 pm
  • Hudson: Of course he’s only sorry that he got caught, just as the undreds of other players who have used amd haven’t been caught are relieved at their fortune (to this point) with getting away with it. We’ll see how many of them step forward out of true regret and wuv of da game.

    Mark - YF February 9, 2009, 11:12 pm
  • “Of course he’s only sorry that he got caught”
    Seriously, name me one player who has come out and apologized PRIOR to getting caught. Im not gonna try to defend A-Rod’s actions but his silence prior to getting outed for PEDs is no different than any of the 100s of other players on all other teams that used and havent said a thing.

    sam-YF February 9, 2009, 11:38 pm
  • The only one I can think of is Ken Caminiti, who honestly did have all kinds of personal and substance abuse problems, and did seem genuinely regretful of his past – not just the ‘roids, but all of it. But yeah, I wouldn’t expect a stream of tortured and regretful athletes coming forward to clear their consciences.

    Mark - YF February 9, 2009, 11:52 pm
  • > A-Rod’s claim that he didn’t know what was being put into him is just flat-out laughable.
    Yeah, I thought about it a bit longer and realize I was way wrong to give him a pass there. Paul was right, this is just not plausible.

    attackgerbil February 9, 2009, 11:53 pm
  • A-Rod’s claim that he didn’t know what was being put into him is just flat-out laughable.
    I’ll bite. Why lie about that portion? Seriously, what difference does it make?
    What if he tried everything? What if he went through and took meticulous notes and then went with the best drugs? What if he was snorting coke and tripping on acid too?
    So what?

    Rob February 10, 2009, 12:28 am
  • > Why lie about that portion?
    Yeah, why?
    > Seriously, what difference does it make?
    None. Just lame.

    attackgerbil February 10, 2009, 12:46 am
  • Hudson said it perfectly.
    I didn’t see the actual presser, but reading the transcript it seemed like Gammons was feeding him his lines. Two points for a degree of honesty, I guess, but he’ll always seem disingenuous to me.

    Jackie (SF) February 10, 2009, 1:48 am
  • Watching that Gammons interview with A-Rod just reiterates for me how Alex always seems to convey an “Eddie Haskell” air about him.
    Even A-Rod’s choice of blue sweater and white collared shirt had a kind of “insincerity vibe” to it.

    SoxFan February 10, 2009, 2:47 am
  • reading the comments here and reactions in general, you almost have to feel sorry for the guy a bit…his was the only one on a list of 104 names that got leaked…we’ve also argued at length about the motives for that and whether or not the remaining names should be revealed…doesn’t seem fair not to, but then again, maybe fairness isn’t the issue…looks like we’ve got folks that just hate arod, and are loving this screwup, folks for whom no explanation would ever be enough, and those who are grudgingly giving him the benefit of the doubt…i guess he doesn’t deserve more than that, but he just never seems to get any love…he’s made one of the most forthright admissions so far, but it’s just not good enough for some of you…he didn’t even wear the right sweater…sheeesh…whether his lack of love is his own doing or not, i still feel a bit sorry for him…
    some of you guys are way to hung up on the “i don’t know what i took comment”…since the test results were never shared with him, all he knows is that it was one of the banned substances…i read that as he may have taken more than one, and isn’t sure which one read positive…not remembering the specifics is not a crime…i have a family doctor…when i don’t feel well i go see him…occasionally he prescibes some unpronounceable medication that’s supposed to make me feel better…i don’t know what it is, and i don’t know what the chemical makeup is…i just know that i trust him, and the medication will make me feel better…

    dc February 10, 2009, 8:20 am
  • his silence prior to getting outed for PEDs
    Nitpicky, but A-Rod wasn’t silent. He denied using them on national TV. But I think I got what you meant.
    Why lie about knowing what drug?
    Obviously I don’t know, but if you’re trying to still justify doing something you know (or you know others think) is very bad, then the first step is admitting you did it, but making it sound like it was part of the culture and you just didn’t know any better, you were “young and naive.” It’s human nature. It’s certainly A-Rod’s nature — try to manage the image, even when the image has been destroyed.

    Paul SF February 10, 2009, 9:41 am
  • As far as knowing what was going into his body or not, I think its important to point out that he didnt say he didnt know that it was a PED or illegal just that he didnt know the name of the drug. This makes it quite different than the “flaxseed defense” of Barry Bonds. I know that some differ from me on this but to me its well within the realm of possibility that a player could accept or take shots of some sort of drug without knowing or remembering its name. Id agree that he wouldnt do anything to his body without knowing what it did and what its side effects where but I dont see this as mutual exclusive from knowing the name of the drug. In the end, I also dont really see why this matters anyway…

    sam-YF February 10, 2009, 9:47 am
  • I also dont really see why this matters anyway…
    I am not so sure it matters either, Sam, other than that we can get a better understanding of Rodriguez’ regrets through this kind of statement. I am not sure he really does regret doing the drugs. I mean, regardless of causation and correlation, the drugs didn’t hurt him. They didn’t hurt his statistics, he didn’t get injured from them, he was able to parlay his accomplishments in Texas into several hundred million dollars.
    When he has to inject “I didn’t even know what I was doing” into his “apology” it sure makes it sound like he’s just trying to wish away his transgressions, that he was caught up in something, that he just went with the crowd, that this was all just naivete. Rodriguez wasn’t a child when he moved on to Texas, he was already a schooled veteran. And he did this for THREE YEARS, by his own admission. At some point these choices are ones made by adults, and for me this quote is all about us having to accept him as some sort of immature kid who got caught with a beer behind the gymnasium during High School, and frankly I find that utterly disingenuous. In the end it won’t matter much, you are right, other than in how we perceive Rodriguez. And we will all perceive him differently, for many reasons. And to be clear, for me it’s not about the uniform, it’s more than that. I will likely have to write this same comment about a Sox player, sooner rather than later, and am fully prepared to do so.
    So while I appreciate that he has gone on the record, I also feel like he is still playing a game with us and with himself. I guess that’s the state of baseball.

    SF February 10, 2009, 10:15 am
  • Sounded kind of hollow and rationalized, and … oh, crap, I gotta go call the cops. Selena Roberts is trying to break into my house.

    I'mBillMcNeal February 10, 2009, 10:28 am
  • “When he has to inject “I didn’t even know what I was doing” into his “apology” ”
    After rewatching the interview, I really didnt see it as this. He admits to doing drugs but just isnt specific into the drugs that he took. Again, he didnt say something like “I took lots of supplements and some how this one got in there, I have no idea how”. To me he comes off as knowing exactly what he was doing in the general sense (ie. taking steroids) but perhaps not the specifics of what he took. He has framed his confession as a decision to take steroids and thus knew what he was doing in the broader sense. I have no idea if this is true but as I said above I think its possible. As dc pointed out, many of us have taken drugs, etc prescribed to us without knowing or at least remembering the exact name of the drug. In a case like A-Rod’s, I could imagine him not even wanting to know the names as a way of distancing himself subconsciously from cheating. None of this is meant as a justification of A-Rod. I simply dont find this element of the story to amount to that much in the grand scheme of things.

    sam-YF February 10, 2009, 10:44 am
  • By comparison with the responses of every other player caught, and that’s the context we’re dealing with, I don’t see how any one could have much of a problem with what A-Rod said.
    That said, he’s going to continue to answer questions. If there’s an shadiness to his story it will become obvious.
    I simply dont find this element of the story to amount to that much in the grand scheme of things.
    I couldn’t agree more. We’re entering the Rorschach phase of analysis, but the context matters. The guy went far beyond what others have said, when he didn’t have to at least not legally, and while his identity of the last twenty years was at stake. He gets major props from me.
    try to manage the image, even when the image has been destroyed.
    Sorry, but if he stays healthy for the next nine years, he’s a HOFer sooner or later (and with him, Bonds). He may not be considered the best of all time, but then that’s an argument for bars and blogs.

    Rob February 10, 2009, 10:58 am
  • ‘Even A-Rod’s choice of blue sweater and white collared shirt had a kind of “insincerity vibe” to it.’
    Are you seriously arguing that A-Rod’s clothing was insincere? Christ.
    I’m sorry, I just think that typifies the nitpicking that’s been going on this thread and all over the media over this. Why is everyone so obsessed with whether he is “truly” sorry or not? We’re not his damn life coaches. And it doesn’t change what he did. But I guess we have to argue about whether or not he really knew WHICH banned anabolic steroid substance he was taking and if the color of his V-Neck really was as deceitful as his blackest of hearts..
    There is no deeper meaning or great mystery here: He was unfortunate enough to get caught and realized his best move was to confess – end of. Personally I don’t see how any of this makes him better or worse than any of the other multitudes of users (well, maybe a bit better than Clemens and his ilk of denying deniers).

    Mark February 10, 2009, 11:23 am
  • Was his clothing insincere? Hell yeah.
    A-Rod should have gone with a black turtleneck. Either that or a pink dress shirt. :)

    SoxFan February 10, 2009, 3:14 pm
  • “…And to be clear, for me it’s not about the uniform, it’s more than that. I will likely have to write this same comment about a Sox player, sooner rather than later, and am fully prepared to do so….”
    some of us will hold you to that buddy…especially if it’s current or contributing [04, 07] sox members…you got a bit of a pass on the mitchell gang, because i believe they were referred to as “lesser” players…

    dc February 10, 2009, 7:38 pm
  • I have watched the video a few times now. I do feel for the guy in that he was one of 104 that was outed…smells like someone took some sawbucks for a name.
    As for an honest apology..eh…dont know..doesn’t matter to me.
    The I dont know what I took…I agree with DC that we (normal peeps in life) really dont question what our doctor gives us, these guys treat thier bodies like it is a shrine. So for a guy who was making more than the GNP of most countries, I am not sure if that is really true. It doens mean that I think he is less than whale scum. Just dont know if it really matters. A lot of people are talking about how the Yanks have been smeared by this. But to be honest, to think that the Sox had no one? No one here has denied it..but think…Vaugh (traced to it in the Mitchell report)…Roger (not sure if he got into the atomic bomb then or not)…and last but not least…Jose. Like the guy wasnt juicing at Fenway. The last few years he took his juicing regimen on a tour of the bigs with numerous stops.
    Someone just needs to destroy the list and move on. to think that everytime the Yanks come on ESPN this is all Joe Morgan is going to talk about…..

    Rob SF February 10, 2009, 8:41 pm
  • Rob SF’s post above leads me to throw out the list of known users with big ties to the Sox off the top of my head:
    Jose Canseco
    Jeremy Giambi
    Paxton Crawford
    Manny Alexander
    Roger Clemens
    Mo Vaughn
    I’ve said before that I think Clemens started using in the mid 1990s — you see what looks to be the beginning of a downward slope, followed by a lot of ligament injuries, followed by a pretty dominant 1996 (marred by injuries) and then the break through in 1997 in Toronto. 1994-96 looks to be the genesis. Just me guessing, but I feel it’s at least semieducated.
    I think Nomar is a slam dunk. I mean, he’s the only player I’ve ever seen whose muscle growth and injury patterns were so suspicious that a columnist (Bob Ryan) could write a piece for a respectable daily newspaper accusing him of taking steroids and the overall response is, “Well, that makes sense…”

    Paul SF February 10, 2009, 11:16 pm
  • I dont want to throw names out there for the sake of it or to start a war here but there are a few more names on the sox teams from the late 90s and early 2000s that I wouldnt be in the least surprised were PED users. One needs to remember that body mass is not a pure indicator of use (eg. Brian Roberts and Chuck Knoblauch). I also believe that there was a much bigger problem with pitchers than we know about with the names that have been released. For the record, I also feel that it is likely that at least a few more Yankees from this time period are on this list too….

    sam-YF February 11, 2009, 12:09 am
  • Nomar is the one I think we all wouldn’t be surprised about. Johnny Damon is another one for me, and maybe Trot and Varitek.

    Atheose February 11, 2009, 6:47 am
  • I am not a fan of “throwing names out”, for a lot of reasons. We should be very careful here.

    SF February 11, 2009, 8:17 am
  • i agree sf…it’s sufficient to say that probably every team had a problem somewhat larger than what has thus far been reported, and leave it at that until more facts come out…

    dc February 11, 2009, 8:59 am
  • I agree – you can’t just throw names out there, even if you’re like an believe most of the league tried a PED at some point and some players are even more suspicious than the norm. But Gagne was named in the Mitchell Report, right?
    I think the reason why nobody thinks many Red Sox were named is that we haven’t seen an impact player from one of their championship seasons named yet.

    Mark - YF February 11, 2009, 11:50 am
  • I wasnt trying to start a McCarthy Era witch hunt of names…wasnt the intent. Was more just making a point that the Yanks weren’t alone in this, that there are players with ties to the Sox who had done this stuff also (and been named).

    Rob SF February 11, 2009, 7:17 pm
  • I hadn’t had a chance to read much of the A-Rod interview, beyond what was quoted in the news stories. Going back and reading other excerpts, I was surprised this wasn’t more widely reported:
    What makes me upset is Sports Illustrated pays this lady Selena Roberts to stalk me. This lady has been thrown out of my apartment in New York City. This lady has, five days ago she was thrown out of the University of Miami police for tresspassing. And four days ago she tried to break into my house while my girls are up there sleeping, and got cited by the Miami Beach Police. I have the paper here. And this lady’s coming out with all these allegations, all these lies, because she’s writing an article for Sports Illustrated. And she’s coming out with a book in May. And really respectable journalists are following this lady off the cliff, and following her lead. And that to me is unfortunate.
    Heck of an apology in which he calls the allegations he just admitted were true “all these lies,” and that “respectable journalists” reporting on these exact same allegations “are following this lady off the cliff.” It’s almost as if he had a separate script in which he denied everything and got them mixed up halfway through the interview.
    The whole rant is disturbing — and not in the way A-Rod seems to intend.

    Paul SF February 11, 2009, 7:32 pm

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