Just Durable

For once, the Boston Herald is urging calm — regarding the J.D. Drew situation, no less:

The intense public interest in the matter has intrigued baseball front-office types, considering most free agent contracts aren’t officially completed for several weeks after an agreement is reached or announced because of language and insurance matters. For what it’s worth, the Sox have other free agents — at the major league and minor league levels — whose deals already have been announced but haven’t been officially completed because of wording issues. Keep in mind that Epstein’s own contract wasn’t finalized during the entirety of the 2006 season.

The difference is, of course, those deals were actually announced. This one hasn’t been.

10 comments… add one
  • Maybe Theo, Boras, and JD know that without this, we bloggers have nothing to discuss.
    If so, thanks, guys!

    SF January 23, 2007, 10:49 am
  • My, my, what a load of shite. The Drew situation is highly unusual.

    Andrews January 23, 2007, 11:22 pm
  • …or maybe the sox decided that they don’t need drew now that they couldn’t pull off a deal involving manny…the “pending a physical” clause seems like a convenient out for teams with buyer’s remorse…

    dc January 24, 2007, 8:57 am
  • the “pending a physical” clause seems like a convenient out for teams with buyer’s remorse
    You’re kidding, right? When you buy a car, do you have a chance to inspect it before you drive it off the lot, or do you feel totally comfortable taking the dealer’s word for it that it’s fine and let them just drop it off at your house sight unseen?
    The club has every right to have their own physicians perform a checkup. The player and his agent might be truthful, but it is nothing but proper due diligence to make sure that this is the case. It would be totally crazy to not demand a team doctor perform a physical, no matter who the player is or what their health record might be.

    SF January 24, 2007, 9:16 am
  • …i didn’t say it wasn’t the team’s right to insist on a physical…any team who didn’t insist on that ought to have their [collective] head[s] examined…all i was saying was that given a team’s [apparent] immense leverage to declare a player “fit to play”, a team could use it as a convenient out particularly if the landscape were to change, which it did in this case…

    dc January 24, 2007, 9:34 am
  • a team could use it as a convenient out particularly if the landscape were to change, which it did in this case
    I understand this in theory. But can you name the instances in which this has happened? It’s gotta be really rare. Even with Drew it’s not clear that this is anything but a very drawn out (almost ridiculously so) legal discussion based on doctor’s findings.
    With Drew, he comes with a pretty highly publicized health history. So are the Sox just “leveraging” Drew, or have they seen something funny? Is he just basically unhealthy or damaged goods in waiting (as many have charged here and elsewhere) or are the Sox being devious? I don’t think it can be had both ways, in this case. I for one think the Sox are doing something intelligent here, which is trying to reduce risk based on medical exams. This is the essence of due diligence, and I imagine Scott Boras has very little issue with it, and understands it, in particular with a player like Drew. And I imagine Boras is pushing back, trying to protect Drew’s fiduciary interests. I don’t think the Sox are re-assessing their move with regards to Drew and trying to find a way out.
    Again, this is dragging like mad, but there isn’t any noise about Drew looking for other suitors, or the Sox thinking of bailing on the contract. Wouldn’t that kind of static emanate in a contentious and all-or-nothing negotiation, as it has with Boras in the past, almost universally?

    SF January 24, 2007, 9:51 am
  • …i agree, the silence is deafening…i was merely offering up a “what if” scenario, especially since [as you pointed out] this has dragged out far beyond what is normally the case with contracts that require language to protect the team against injury to a player…seems wierd…there won’t be any animosity if they can get a deal done that is “favorable” to both parties…i saw somewhere though that the boras medical team said drew is alright, while the sox medical team says he is not…that might be a recipe for animosity, particularly if the deal blows up…we can sort it out then…

    dc January 24, 2007, 10:44 am
  • “Wouldn’t that kind of static emanate in a contentious and all-or-nothing negotiation, as it has with Boras in the past, almost universally?

    IF there were any other interested parties. Maybe in this case, given Drew’s health and personality issues, coupled with the tremendous salary he expects to receive, no other teams are even considering him?

    Andrews January 24, 2007, 10:47 am
  • With Boras, the lack of interested parties has never stopped him from inventing one or two. So I agree that the silence here is very telling as to how little trouble the deal itself actually is in.

    Paul SF January 24, 2007, 11:34 am
  • ” inventing one or two”
    But after this long, how believable would that be?
    Again, this is really unusual; I think the deal will get done, but not as originally announced. Maybe the sox are trying to negotiate a lower price, based on lack of other interest? Drew’s physical couldn’t have been that surprising.

    Andrews January 24, 2007, 12:08 pm

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