The Bombshell Reverberates

Unconfirmed reports (read: I just made this up) tell YFSF that Theo Epstein was heard this afternoon thanking the baseball gods over and over again for the MLBPA, Larry Lucchino and their mutually assured destruction of the 2004 A-Rod deal with Boston.

Meanwhile, around the Infotubes, reaction has been swift and varied:

A-Rod giveth, and A-Rod taketh away. 

The Yankees already were about to begin a season steeped in pressure because: 1) They didn't make the playoffs last year. 2) They spent nearly half a billion dollars this offseason to make sure that never happens again. 3) They are moving into a new stadium. Now Rodriguez has again had the messy details of his life destructively suffocate an entire organization. He is the bad gift that keeps on giving.

"It is a PR nightmare, but nothing we can do anything about," one Yankees official said. …

There will be a defense mounted. One of his friends, for example, said today that Rodriguez had not failed a test at either the 2006 World Baseball Classic, which used Olympic-level testing, or since Major League Baseball instituted random testing and suspensions for failing tests in 2004.

That would be a lot more convincing without SI's equally important scoop about Gene Orza informing A-Rod about a test in 2004.

The NYT, with two sources of their own:

It remains unclear why the union did not have the 2003 tests destroyed once the survey was completed. It had the right to do so under the original testing agreement with Major League Baseball. The union is restricted by court order from commenting on why the tests were not destroyed.

Rodriguez, too, may be pondering why those tests weren’t destroyed.

Or why he, such a supremely gifted athlete, felt the need to take the drugs in the first place.

A friend close to A-Rod, who is due to report to Yankee spring training in Tampa on Feb. 18 and is currently staying in Miami, told the Daily News Saturday that Rodiguiez "has turned his phone off. This is a mess. I'm not sure how he's going to take this. He's never had to deal with anything like this before."

Yankees' general manager Brian Cashman had very little to say about the report, having learned of it less than an hour before being reached by the Daily News.

"At this stage, we have no comment," Cashman said.

Adam Kilgore in the Globe didn't take long to break out the photo comparisons:

Despite his size (compare this A-Rod and this A-Rod) and accomplishments, Rodriguez had never been widely suspected as a steroid user, even after Jose Canseco’s accusation. In 2006, The New York Times used as the cover for its baseball preview section a painting of Rodriguez blasting a home run into a light tower whose bulbs spelled “755.” The headline to the accompanying article was “Aaron’s Ultimate Challenger May Be a Natural After All.”

The news could not only affect the Yankees, but also baseball as a whole. Attendance was bound to plummet, anyway, this season because of the nation’s economic woes. There are 104 names on that previously anonymous list of players who tested positive in 2003. Who else could be on it, and what will happen if those names enter the public eye?

The ramifications of this revelation on baseball attendance are likely miniscule compared to the ramifications of the sliding economy — for that matter, likely miniscule, period.

RAB accurately divines the real blockbuster in this stor and why it destroys the "no positive tests aince '03" argument:

At this point, I have to assume that A-Rod has passed numerous drug tests and has been clean, but this story will still be a P.R. disaster because of a subsequent development in 2004. After A-Rod’s failed test as a member of the Rangers in 2003, he may have been warned in 2004 when, as a Yankee, his name popped up on the testing rolls again. Reportedly, A-Rod is the unnamed player whom Gene Orza, COO of the players union, was accused of tipping off to an impending drug test in 2004.

Was Watching is notable for this comment, posted before the SI report hit:

How cool would it be to have a full 12-month period, or longer, where A-Rod doesn’t have “another thing” to deal with?

A quick perusal of the Sox blogs has them taking the high road — at least for now — with little commentary beyond the straight news reporting/link posting. Well, except for Surviving Grady (not known for their restraint when it comes to the Yankees), with the headline, "Juicer!":

Sports Illustrated is reporting what many of us in Red Sox Nation have suspected for quite a while: A-Rod tested positive for steroids. …

Perfect.

Count me, then, among the few in Red Sox Nation who suspected this — or think it is anything resembling perfect.

33 comments… add one

  • I am surprised, frankly, mostly because A-Rod doesn’t have that big roidy body that I associate with juicing, and he’s been held up for so long as proof that you can be phenomenally successful in the MLB without using steroids.
    I feel like this outing may be a turning point – it just keeps becoming more and more clear that the majority of upper eschelon players were/are using PEDs, maybe it will stop being such a huge deal? (The Orza warning thing will be huge, though.) I’m experiencing some schadenfreude with A-Rod just because I can’t stand the dude, but with every name that comes out I care less and less. I almost feel bad for him, in that he was the only one of the 100+ players on that list to be named, but I’m sure the other names will come out eventually (if any of them are big enough to care about).
    Heck, perhaps A-Rod can be held up now as an example of how to use steroids properly – his body isn’t terribly weird, and he hasn’t had the strange injuries that people associate with suspected juicers (cough, Nomar) or awkward career trajectory.

    Jackie (SF) February 7, 2009, 6:17 pm
  • It is also worth at least mentioning that the author of this piece for SI is Selena Roberts. She may be a reputable reporter but she also has a book coming out about A-Rod in May. While Im not accusing her of fabricating this story by any mean she may also have ulterior motives as well. Anyway, it is what it is, just thought id drop this into the thread.

    sam-YF February 7, 2009, 7:49 pm
  • Given that Surviving Grady declared Truck Day “pants optional” yesterday I think we can discount their commentary from the general Sox feeling that somewhere on that list of 104 names is someone who will make us wince. I really do hope this curtails the utter indignation with which people argue that Bonds, McGwire and Clemens shouldn’t be in the Hall of Fame.

    rootbeerfloat February 7, 2009, 7:58 pm
  • Its sad but not suprising. Are there ANY clean baseball players out there?

    the mayor February 7, 2009, 10:29 pm
  • A quick perusal of the Sox blogs has them taking the high road
    Clearly you haven’t perused SoSH, which has way too many Sox fans gloating about what a great day this is, “Christmas in February”. I find this attitude loathsome and criminally shortsighted.
    This has been a horrible day, and SFs who gloat about A-Rod’s travails are going to have this bite them in the ass, deservedly, at some point.
    This is a terrible day for baseball.

    SF February 7, 2009, 11:05 pm
  • to add to Paul’s culling of the responses, this from Kepner’s NYT story:
    “His legacy, now, is gone,” one Yankees official said of Rodriguez, speaking on condition of anonymity because the organization had no public comment. “He’ll just play it out. Now he’s a worker. Do your job, collect your paycheck and when you’re finished playing, go away. That’s what it is.”
    Coming from inside the Yankees, this seems especially harsh, and perhaps a tad overstated. We don’t know how this will play out, and we don’t know what the ultimate legacy of PED users will be in the long term.

    SF February 7, 2009, 11:13 pm
  • I had not perused SOSH. It’s a message board anyway — albeit a pretentious one — and has all the problems (to go with the benefits) message boards have, including the tendency toward massive groupthink, particularly when the subject is the Yankees.
    I do think for its format, SOSH is the best there is, but on issues like this — which don’t really require reasoned statistics-based analysis — it’s really no better than NYYFans or LoHud’s comment pages.

    Paul SF February 7, 2009, 11:16 pm
  • Without reading the story for additional cotext, “one Yankees official” could be Cashman himself, or it could be someone much, much lower to whom A-Rod was rude once back in 2005. I’d guess something like the latter, which would obviously rob it of its “inside the Yankee camp” cachet.

    Paul SF February 7, 2009, 11:18 pm
  • When that dope Canseco first said this, I wanted it to be true but never believed it was.
    I never imagined that he would do it or would have any reason to do it.
    Now that it appears to be so, I feel really dirty, like I need a shower. And I certainly don’t feel like there’s something worth gloating about.
    And I’m gonna say this, too: If it turns out that Manny was one of the other 103, I’m gonna have a real hard time watching baseball ever again.
    This is indeed a dark day for MLB. This is proof that the assholes who were roiding weren’t just cup-of-coffee guys (Jeremy Giambi, Brady Anderson), the freakishly large (Jason Giambi, Clemens) and headcases (Bury Bonds, Clemens).
    But maybe … maybe it’s good that Rodriguez is among the implicated. It tells us just how widespread it’s been, and sends a clear message that extensive measures must be taken to clean it up.
    Next question: You’re Rodriguez’s publicity agent. How do you advise him to go on from here?

    I'mBillMcNeal February 7, 2009, 11:30 pm
  • Hey, if A-Rod’s ‘legacy is gone’, maybe that takes the pressure off and he can just do what he does best – play the game of baseball.
    And come on. If steroid usage was widespread, of which there is mounting evidence, then your reaction would be to give up the game you grew up loving? Come on. I would argue (with no factual basis, of course) that baseball is cleaner today than it’s ever been. The problem with steroids, I’m guessing, is not so much that it’s cheating (cheating is embedded in the history of the game…do people really feel ‘shame’ about pine tar or scuffing the baseball, or using the same ball the entire game?), it’s that it’s actually illegal in the United States. Cheating in baseball used to be innocent, but when you involve things that are actually a crime, it becomes much more serious. No one got arrested for throwing the 1919 World Series. Pete Rose didn’t get thrown into prison for betting on baseball. I’m guessing that’s where the difference lies. But really, is it that bad? It’s not like there’s a ring of baseball players killing dogs for sport. They’re doing it to themselves.
    But in pure baseball terms, I don’t see how the widespread use of steroids can turn someone away from the game they’ve been addicted to for years.

    AndrewYF February 7, 2009, 11:59 pm
  • Let me say this, I am sad for the game of baseball. It was just last season when ESPN was running all the stories about how great it would be when A-Rod finally broke Bonds record and baseball would once again have a “clean” HR champion. Baseball keeps taking hit after hit after hit.
    I am trying not to make this a Yankees/Sox issue, but I for one am fed up. It seems that there was a whole generation of offenders, yet over and over again it’s someone associated with the Yankees that gets outed. I understand it being part of the Mitchell Report simply because of who they interviewed. But there were 103 other names on that report and the only one released (so far) was a Yankee? I am not a journalist, but I fully do understand the appeal of outing a Yankee. If this was a random Florida Marlin this wouldn’t even be a story, but because it’s Alex and he is a Yankee it’s a 24/7 ESPN story. We have learned over the past few seasons that it’s FOOLISH to believe that there aren’t more offenders and that this is exclusive to the Yankees. The intellectual (mostly, LOL) fans that visit this site get that, but I cannot tell you how many stupid comments I have heard today alone about “Well next up is Jeter” or “Highest payroll in the game and they still have to cheat.” I want the other 103 names, I want players that went from average to above average in a very short period of time targeted and investigated and I want all the information at once. Stop leaking little by little and stop avoiding the unavoidable. Tell me everything and tell me everything now. If we are going to do this, let’s do it the right way. I will save you guys the time, I understand that this is a very elementary, juvenile approach, but I have had enough. I have said it a ton of times here, I am a baseball fan first, Yankee fan second. But enough is enough, I am sick of the Yankees always have a giant bulls eye on their back all the time.
    To answer IBM’s question, I go the Andy Pettitte route. It’s the easiest and safest way to go. His numbers were good before 2003, they were good after 2003, no real spike. So come out and say:
    “I was battling a _____ injury and this was the best way for me to stay on the field and help my team. I was making a lot of money and I wanted to make sure I was doing everything in my power to earn that $ and help my team, hurt or otherwise. It was only during the 2003 season and after that I realized what I was doing was wrong. While I was not breaking any MLB rules (point that out, that’s key) I still felt like it was time to stop.”

    John - YF February 8, 2009, 12:01 am
  • But there were 103 other names on that report and the only one released (so far) was a Yankee?
    The only one released was the best player in the game, the de facto favorite to be the next home run king. Is there any other name more newsworthy than his, regardless of team affiliation?
    I am not a journalist, but I fully do understand the appeal of outing a Yankee.
    I hate to say this, but why do Yankee fans make it about the Yankees? This is about A-Rod. If Alex Rodriguez were a member of the Red Sox, had won the three MVPs and likewise also won the two rings, you could argue this would be even a BIGGER story.
    If this was a random Florida Marlin this wouldn’t even be a story, but because it’s Alex and he is a Yankee it’s a 24/7 ESPN story.
    If this were a random New York Yankee, this wouldn’t be a story either. If Melky Cabrera tested positive and was suspended 50 games, would anyone here give a crap?
    Stop leaking little by little and stop avoiding the unavoidable. Tell me everything and tell me everything now. If we are going to do this, let’s do it the right way.
    I too would like to know the list just to know it and be done. It seems inevitable that eventually it will come out. I don’t know how the reporters got the info, but I imagine they worked a source who refused to simply give them a list (which could be subpoenaed and potentially traced back to him, depending on the strength of California’s shield laws), but said he would give them the biggest name on the list. With name in hand, they got not one independent confirmation (which is usually good enough), they got THREE. That’s impressive.
    The thing we don’t know is if there are any other big names on there. Pujols? Ortiz? They aren’t as big as A-Rod, but they could arguably be even more devastating to the game, given that people actually like them. Whenever the list is released, I’ll be steeled for any possibility, as long as Pedro and Papi aren’t on it.
    I am sick of the Yankees always have a giant bulls eye on their back all the time.
    You do not have my sympathies. You want the Yankees not to have a bull’s eye? How about spending money and winning at the same rate as the Royals or Pirates. No one will give two hoots about the Yankees then, and you can feel better.
    I learned this quickly after 2004, and especially after 2007, when the Sox went from “lovable losers” to “Yankees Part 2.” When a team is wildly successful, they will be targeted — by envious fans of rival teams, by the less-reputable media entities and by any low life looking to make a name by bringing down the pristige of the club. I will gladly accept these annoyances for the pleasure of rooting for a successful, playoff-bound team five years out of six.
    All that said, this story isn’t about the Yankees and their bull’s eye. It’s about A-Rod and his. The sooner you come to grips with that — and ignore the losers trying to turn this into a Yankee issue — the better you’ll feel.

    Paul SF February 8, 2009, 1:18 am
  • i’m not gonna go as far as reveling in the disappointment of this story, but there is some bright side for SF’s. conseco implicated a-rod as a user pre-2000. if we are to believe reports, gene orza was well aware of a-rods doping and continued to help a-rod beat the process. so conceivably a-rod could have been doping from ’99-???. i just keep hearing people comparing stats from ’02 to ’03 looking for a spike that clearly isn’t there as to isolate instances. equally troubling, there’s no way of telling when or if he stopped. from an SF’s prospective, how nice would it be to see a-rod regress into a .300/25/100 for the next 9 years at $30,000,000 per?

    sf rod February 8, 2009, 3:28 am
  • > how nice would it be to see a-rod regress
    Whether he does or doesn’t, it matters little to his detractors, no?

    attackgerbil February 8, 2009, 5:30 am
  • it’s depends ag. some detractors want a-rod the person to fail. i guess i fall into the camp of detractors that wants the yankee a-rod to fail. it’s always fun to savor his post season failures and basepath hijinx, but the personal stuff making news has always rubbed me wrong. it feels like this new development makes me angry at the person. a place, as a detractor, i never thought i’d be. so for me, i wanna believe a-rods been doing this for awhile and has just stopped recently and is headed for a drop-off.

    sf rod February 8, 2009, 6:07 am
  • I think the biggest problem that you’re not fully understanding is that I live in NJ, you live in _____ many, many miles away from NY talk radio, TV news and newspaper. So to answer “but why do Yankee fans make it about the Yankees?”: It’s because that’s the way it’s portrayed and what we have to deal with everyday! Your sensible approach is correct, but because you live somewhere outside this area it’s easy to say (that and the fact that you are a Sox fan). Every talk radio show I heard yesterday was how the Yankees (as a team) going to block out yet another distraction and just play baseball. How is this going to upset the balance of an already tumultuous clubhouse? If there was a segment on how it affects Alex, then I must have missed it. The only news source I heard talk about his HOF career now being in question was ESPN.
    I disagree slightly about the if it was Melky Cabrera scenario. I think regardless of the status of the Yankee player that fails it still is more news worthy to the journalists simply because it is a Yankee. Now I know it wouldn’t be on the same level as Alex, but it still seems like finding out damaging news about the Yankees is like the stuffed animal on the top row at the boardwalk, everyone is shooting for it.
    To answer your last few paragraphs, I am not looking for sympathy. I don’t care about the ire of fans, that’s been that way well before the Yankees started being relevant once again back in 1995. It’s the media, as you stated and their constant digging and looking to bring down the prestige, as you stated. I don’t want the Yankees to be loved, I just want them to be able to go to spring training once and just be able to focus on baseball. Unfortunately for the Yankees, I don’t see that ever happening.
    I think what I need to do is once again start my ban of talk radio in the car. I stopped listening after the 2004 season for probably 2 years or so. It just became more frustrating than enjoyable, as it is becoming once again. I think ideally as you stated above my personality (my hatred of all things drama and my love for the game) is probably better suited to be a fan of the Royals or Pirates, but I am in too deep now. I guess it is I that needs to adjust and deal.

    John - YF February 8, 2009, 10:05 am
  • The only one released was the best player in the game, the de facto favorite to be the next home run king. Is there any other name more newsworthy than his, regardless of team affiliation?
    By playing for the Yankees, with his talent and performance, especially projected to the end of his career, he’s the biggest name in the game even as he’s not the best player in the game. Pujols and Hanley are better, and frankly I wouldn’t be surprised if either were juicers. Pujols is a big guy. But yeah, no name is more newsworthy right now.
    I hate to say this, but why do Yankee fans make it about the Yankees?
    I hate to say this here, but for the general public Yankees = baseball. The only way it would have been a bigger story for the Sox is if A-Rod led them to that title in 2004. But I doubt, even then, that it would transcend the sport. This surely does, like Bonds, Clemens, and McGwire did.
    How about spending money and winning at the same rate as the Royals or Pirates. No one will give two hoots about the Yankees then, and you can feel better.
    Not true, because of history. Then the story would be “Look how the mighty have fallen”. There’s no erasing that. The sad fact is the NY market has six to eight newspapers, including the biggest namebrand paper, trying to compete. There are stories about the Yankees even when there aren’t any.
    Alex’s bullseye took a leap to a new level when he went to Yankees. There’s no denying that. He makes the the most money playing for the most well-known team. Their attendance reached four million a year only after he arrived. If this came out when he was a Ranger it would have been big news. Now it’s stratospheric.

    Rob February 8, 2009, 11:14 am
  • I find it highly dubious that players could be helped to cheat right now, given that the sport’s highest administrators were hauled before Congress. Also, the WBC has Olympic type testing based on blood samples. Alex will have participated in both.

    Rob February 8, 2009, 11:18 am
  • I find it highly dubious that players could be helped to cheat right now, given that the sport’s highest administrators were hauled before Congress. Also, the WBC has Olympic type testing based on blood samples. Alex will have participated in both.

    Rob February 8, 2009, 11:18 am
  • You’re Rodriguez’s publicity agent. How do you advise him to go on from here?
    Everyone is saying that he has to come clean. Fully and honestly.
    Problem is, has he ever done either?

    Rob February 8, 2009, 11:21 am
  • I don’t know about you guys, but looking at thephotos, A-Rod definitely looks bigger, especially in the chest, in 2002-2003 and maybe 2004. By 2006 it seems to be gone and that’s right about the time we was coming to camp “worried” about his weight.

    Rob February 8, 2009, 11:41 am
  • What I don’t understand is why everyone thinks Aaron is the ‘true’ home run king. He himself is an admitted user of amphetamines, better known as ‘greenies’.
    I really think this whole thing is going to get so large, so widespread, that baseball will have no choice but to grandfather this entire era of baseball history into the record books. People were using performance enhancers in the 60s. I have no doubt Mantle was a user. Reggie probably was as well. And, like it or not, guys like Griffey and Manny are probably users too. I think it will take that kind of perspective to realize that guys like Bonds and Clemens and A-Rod are merely the best ones that used steroids, not the only ones.

    AndrewYF February 8, 2009, 12:24 pm
  • Hopefully it means more use of stats like OPS+ and ERA+ which normalize for the year. Actually, if sportswriters in ten years are explaining to readers what it means to normalize stats I call it a win-win!

    Rob February 8, 2009, 1:22 pm
  • “I would argue (with no factual basis, of course) that baseball is cleaner today than it’s ever been.”
    I think a person could easily argue this point successfully. Greenies, roids … they have been banned. Unless there’s a top secret drug out there that no one knows about.

    “I don’t know about you guys, but looking at thephotos, A-Rod definitely looks bigger, especially in the chest, in 2002-2003 and maybe 2004. By 2006 it seems to be gone and that’s right about the time we was coming to camp “worried” about his weight.”
    I’ve never been sold on this photo comparison stuff except in the case of Sosa, who got bigger then smaller. I mean, Chevy Chase got bigger over time. Look at him in “Seems Like Old Times” and compare that to “Vegas Vacation.” (I guess he could have been roiding, too…)

    Lastly, not picking on the Yankees here …
    Points have been made that so many of these guys are associated with the Yankees.
    Makes sense. Why?
    Why do they roid? To get better stats. What happens when they get better stats? They increase their value on the FA market.
    The Yankees have been the team most willing to dole out those huge contracts. And except for Pettitte, if I’m not mistaken, every one of these outed PEDers associated with the Yankees have come in by way of free agency.
    I guess that’s a reciprocal cost of Win Every Year.
    And that’s exactly why we Red Sox fans had better tread lightly on this, because it’s not like we haven’t spent big bucks, too. Just not as much.

    I'mBillMcNeal February 8, 2009, 1:27 pm
  • I think the biggest problem that you’re not fully understanding is that I live in NJ, you live in _____ many, many miles away from NY talk radio, TV news and newspaper. So to answer “but why do Yankee fans make it about the Yankees?”: It’s because that’s the way it’s portrayed and what we have to deal with everyday!
    I think you’re arguing against yourself here: because the NY media make it about the Yankees (sensibly, since that’s what their market is concerned about), and outside of that media area it is more about the individual…. that means it really *is* all about the Yankees? Seems backwards to me.
    I agree it’s BS that only the one name was leaked, but to think that it was leaked because he’s a Yankee and not because he’s the widely celebrated Next Great Hope for Clean Records is silly to me. It’s like saying the Barry Bonds circus was caused by the media gunning for the Giants.

    Jackie (SF) February 8, 2009, 1:53 pm
  • The sports front of today’s Chicago Tribune was devoted almost exclusively to Rodriguez. (Nearly a full-page photo.)
    And be appreciative, Yankee fans, because in the photo he’s wearing a Rangers uniform.
    That would seem to back up Jackie’s point, that away from NY/NJ it’s still HUGE news, but it’s about Rodriguez, not the Yankees.

    I'mBillMcNeal February 8, 2009, 2:11 pm
  • I just read Tony Mazz’s column in today’s Boston Globe.
    http://www.boston.com/sports/columnists/massarotti/
    For what it’s worth, most of his points, if not all of his points, were made yesterday here at yfsf.
    Hmmmmm …

    I'mBillMcNeal February 8, 2009, 3:42 pm
  • Actors get bigger over decades, not years. Go back and look at those photos up to 2001, then 2002-2004, then the 2006 picture. The difference is noticeable…to me at least!

    Rob February 8, 2009, 3:50 pm
  • It’s difficult to say whether A-Rod is a HUGE deal now because he’s a Yankee or because he was the Great Clean Hope, as Jackie said. The two happened at the same time. A-Rod went to the Yankees in 2004, and since then he’s hit enough home runs to legitimize talk that he could break Bonds’ record.
    I believe that if he had hit those home runs in Texas (where he actually probably would have hit even more, given the park) or Boston or anywhere else, this would not be a smaller story. This is a story because of A-Rod, not the Yankees.
    The other stories — the strippers, the Madonna thing, the Jeter stuff, the postseason performance — those are things because A-Rod is a Yankee and covered by the NY press, and obviously those are being used in some of the analysis on this story, but the fact that the story itself is huge I don’t believe has much if anything to do with the Yankees.

    Paul SF February 8, 2009, 4:24 pm
  • Thanks, Bill, for reminding me why I don’t read Tony Mazz anymore. Not only does he not have anything to say (like most of us, really, but then we’re not paid to have things to say), but he goes about it in this haphazard, whatever-pops-into-his-head style that is excruciating to read. He has no point or insight, just a collection of thoughts, strung together and vomited onto a Web site. Again, maybe I could do no better, but I would sure love to get paid to do no worse.

    Paul SF February 8, 2009, 4:31 pm
  • Jackie I don’t think we are on the same page. My argument is the further away from this area, the easier it is to be more sensible and less frustrated about this situation. Sure there is probably coverage of it all across the US, but it’s not like it is here. It also helps that Paul is not a Yankees fan and that Paul is very rational, even keeled kind of guy to begin with. For a Yankees fan living in the NY area, it’s been 24/7 Yankee coverage and not the good kind since Torre’s book was leaked a couple Sunday’s ago. So I am frustrated and as a Yankees fan and a baseball fan I have had enough. You start to feel like sh*t are the Yankees the only team that ever does anything wrong? For the sake of their fans sanity and to take some pressure off the Yankees in Spring Training I’d love to see Hank and Hal hire a P.I. to dig up some dirt on another big market team. Of course I kid, but boy it would be nice to see Player X of the __________ face plastered all over ESPN.

    John - YF February 8, 2009, 5:29 pm
  • John, I feel your pain, in a way.
    It’s been a crappy, cold, wet winter, and we look forward to spring training as the beginning of the end of winter. Even photos of a bleeping truck leaving for Florida read like a warm breeze.
    Then you get these side shows.
    It’s like a blizzard on opening day.

    I'mBillMcNeal February 8, 2009, 6:21 pm
  • i want [demand] to see the other 103 names…no, it doesn’t vindicate arod…but it puts his alleged transgressions in the proper perspective…further, the yankees should be allowed to void his contract, if the allegations are true…i also think the players union should facilitate the independent testing of every single major league player currently under contract, and publicize the results…the only way to restore the fans confidence is to prove to us that the product is clean…

    dc February 8, 2009, 9:18 pm

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