Wang Direction

The Yankees are in quite a spot with Chien-Ming Wang, who has given up an earned run for every two batters faced this season and has an extraordinary WHIP nearing 5.0:

  • He's out of options, so sending him to the minors requires passing through waivers.
  • He's only once in three attempts made it through two innings, which would indicate bullpen work might be similarly disastrous. 
  • His next start is going to be at Fenway Park, where he already has a 5.11 career ERA in 44 innings, third-worst among AL ballparks. 

So what do the Yankees do with their onetime ace? It seems obvious that they will not allow him to pitch against the Red Sox, but then what? 

45 comments… add one

  • Hire Vinny Knuckles to “take care of him”??? I kid, I kid…

    krueg April 19, 2009, 10:45 am
  • Not much to say about this one, skip him next week at Fenway. Figure it out, his track record of success says its there. If he cant figure it out, bring up Hughes…

    sam-YF April 19, 2009, 10:46 am
  • if i’m the yankees, i’m concerned about the pr fiasco of our new launching pad, where major banks of highly visible seats are unused and prices are astronomical.
    given that wang is physically okay, and everyone seems to think he is, that’s less of a concern. there’s an off day so he can skip boston, and if he should continue to struggle, just take a dl assignment to tampa and hughes can take his slot. but the juiced ball that everyone’s been talking about, the hitter friendly new ballpark, and pitching against a great batting team like cleveland (or boston in fenway)–that’s maybe not the best way to get back in the groove.

    YF April 19, 2009, 10:59 am
  • He looks perfectly fine to me.

    SF April 19, 2009, 11:58 am
  • His next start won’t be at Fenway.
    if i’m the yankees, i’m concerned about the pr fiasco of our new launching pad, where major banks of highly visible seats are unused and prices are astronomical.
    I don’t see this as a real concern. But if they wanted to flip the PR they could start a program to give unused seats (and the accompanying orgy of free food) to local school kids. Too bad hell will freeze over first.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 11:58 am
  • prices are astronomical
    We’re paying $20/seat (sec. 409) for 15 games. And my Dad says the seats are better than our pricier Loge tix last year. Between tix, parking, and food outside the stadium, we’ll be paying less than $100 to see each game this year. That’s hardly astronomical.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 12:29 pm
  • The owner of the fabulous HitTracker home run Web site, quoted on WasWatching, says that accounting for weather, balls are flying six feet farther this year than last, and that the chances of that being luck given the sample size are infinitesimal. In other words, something’s going on…

    Paul SF April 19, 2009, 1:38 pm
  • Easy answer: DL him with “arm fatigue” (wink wink) or an undisclosed injury. Then he can get some “rehab assignments” in the minors to work on his mechanics or whatever, and go from there…

    Mark - YF April 19, 2009, 1:56 pm
  • Paul: is that six feet farther league wide?

    Mark - YF April 19, 2009, 1:57 pm
  • Yes, the average home run distance when adjusting for weather is six feet longer than it was last year.

    Paul SF April 19, 2009, 2:04 pm
  • Yeah I read that article as well Paul, very interesting something is clearly up.
    Also, I have to agree with Rob that the prices are NOT astronomical at the new YS. Sure there are some seats that are but on the whole there are many affordable seats…

    sam-YF April 19, 2009, 2:26 pm
  • The prices are astronomical – they may not be for some seats but everything else is ridiculous. That’s where the team is making it up. Not everyone gets to the stadium early enough to sample the fare outside, and a lot of people still want a beer, which you can’t bring in.
    YF and I are in strict agreement on this one regarding the caste system the new park is imposing. They don’t allow fans to filter down into empty seats later in the game, hell, they don’t even let fans into the cheaper seats later in the game, where we were, in the 300 sections.

    SF April 19, 2009, 2:38 pm
  • still want a beer
    And $6 is astronomical?
    YF and I are in strict agreement on this one regarding the caste system the new park is imposing.
    See also: Fenway Park.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 2:44 pm
  • They don’t allow fans to filter down into empty seats later in the game, hell, they don’t even let fans into the cheaper seats later in the game, where we were, in the 300 sections.
    This is also true of most modern stadia – from the NBA to NFL to MLB. Like a first class seat on a plane, access comes with a price irrespective of whether the seat is empty. I don’t like it, but I understand the mentality. But I also don’t think that draconian security will be maintained for the whole season for the entirety of the games. That also costs money.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 2:55 pm
  • Don’t shift the goalposts, however hard it is for you to resist the urge. Fenway has nothing to do with this.

    SF April 19, 2009, 2:55 pm
  • You’re saying the new park “imposes” a caste system. You’re ignoring that it’s always been there and since the very beginning of the sport. Fenway is a perfect historical example.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 3:00 pm
  • “impose” was the wrong word. “Exaggerates extremely and negatively” is the right phrase.

    SF April 19, 2009, 3:10 pm
  • rob, that’s ridiculous. if you want a picture of how a caste system is physically imposed, look at the first picture here:
    http://paulkatcher.com/archives/001191.shtml
    to argue otherwise is purely stupid. and keep in mind that the ny taxpayer paid for this to the tune of several hundred million dollars. in addition, the reasonably priced seats are almost impossible to come by unless you’ve purchased a ticket plan. go actually try to buy a ticket and the options for decent seats at reasonable prices are very meagre. which is one thing if the general public didn’t pay to build the thing, but we did.
    fenway was not designed to be expensive, so it’s a nonstarter argument. forget about it. we’re not discussing fenway here.

    YF April 19, 2009, 3:12 pm
  • no, sf, don’t pull back. impose is EXACTLY the right word, as illustrated above.

    YF April 19, 2009, 3:13 pm
  • You’re getting warmer and if you dropped the silly “astronomical” shtick, I’d probably agree. But then I think:
    First class air travel exaggerates extremely and negatively elicits a caste system.
    So what?

    Rob April 19, 2009, 3:15 pm
  • Please, YF, read your own TOS.
    in addition, the reasonably priced seats are almost impossible to come by unless you’ve purchased a ticket plan.
    Not true. I’m selling tix to a game in two weeks and from the looks of things on ebay, I won’t even get face value, if that.
    Check your facts before calling someone, or their argument “stupid”.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 3:19 pm
  • let me further add, seeing as rob brought up historical precedent, that, yes, there have been differentiated sections within ballparks from the 19th century, but the difference is price between those sections has been relatively small, and the physical separation always fairly permeable. for the most part, early ballparks were general admission, sit where you like, as many mil parks are today, with only a very small section of reserved, if any at all. so the historical argument is specious.
    the “it’s always been that way” argument to me just ignores the degree to which things are different in this new building. it’s a cheap rhetorical strategy. “it was always like that.” but it wasn’t, really.

    YF April 19, 2009, 3:19 pm
  • Aren’t there numerous and easily available tickets offered at cheaper prices for coach-class airfare?

    Paul SF April 19, 2009, 3:20 pm
  • Aren’t there numerous and easily available tickets offered at cheaper prices for coach-class airfare?
    No.
    so the historical argument is specious.
    In the same paragraph where you write it’s be true for over a hundred years.
    the difference is price between those sections has been relatively small
    Specious – not accounting for inflation.
    the physical separation always fairly permeable
    Specious – not recognizing most modern parks have this “feature”.
    as many mil parks are today
    Specious – Name one park in any major league sport where this is true.
    things are different in this new building
    Specious – You’re arguing for a difference in kind when it’s a difference in degree.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 3:27 pm
  • Here’s
    what I’m talking about.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 3:35 pm
  • rob. the price and quality of the seats is substantively different. and to not be buying through the team makes the whole thing unreliable.
    as for your arguments about history, inflation, architecture, and minor (not major) league parks, it’s not worth engaging here. suffice it to say it is both a difference in kind and in degree.

    YF April 19, 2009, 3:54 pm
  • Sure, the secondary market with multiple companies to choose from is unreliable. Ebay, for instance, has a market cap of 18 billion. I don’t think they’d agree with that characterization.
    Whatever, you have some weird axe to grind irrespective of the facts or precedents. Good luck with that.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 3:59 pm
  • “That’s where the team is making it up. Not everyone gets to the stadium early enough to sample the fare outside, and a lot of people still want a beer, which you can’t bring in.”
    Fine SF, the food and beer is expensive but I wouldnt say its much more than most other venue food, especially in the New York area. You cant bring beer in anywhere and its always expensive relative to an other establishments in the area. I really was expecting worse as far as prices go. Ive never been to fenway but I cant imagine a beer and dogs being a bargain there, it certainly wasnt at Camden yards when I visited there…

    sam-YF April 19, 2009, 4:57 pm
  • For perhaps a stretched metaphor, the wealth gap in our country has become incredibly exaggerated, particularly during the Bush years and Yankee Stadium reflects a similar exaggeration. Yes there have always been privileged sections in stadia, that’s not the discussion. But Yankee Stadium, built at tremendous cost to the taxpayer, reserves very little of significance for said taxpayer. The Stadium is a physical manifestation of this widening gap between the haves and the have-nots. Hopefully the haves decide not to show up, and the Yankees learn a lesson.
    As YF has pointed out numerous times, the most galling aspect of this park is that it was built in great part with the public’s money. It fails, quite glaringly, to acknowledge this. There is nothing at the park that I saw, even as a sop, that acknowledges how much the public has literally given to this franchise. That the team basically ignores this handout in a grab for high net worth individuals by making the physical separations within the park more drastic is, to me, a terrible thing. That this has been true in the past at this or other stadia is frankly irrelevant – the team has made something expected (pay-for-access) hyperbolic. and they have done this through the use of public money. Even if you are ok with that (which some of us are, some of us aren’t, so it goes) it is, at best, terribly tone-deaf.

    SF April 19, 2009, 5:39 pm
  • Damn, I hate classic liberal cannards. They’re vapid and moralizing. Seriously, you’re talking about a wealth gap involving people paying to enjoy their leisure time? I just got back from Peru. Maybe you need to travel more…
    Not only is the park and its games downright affordable, but I’d venture that 99.9% of NYers could afford to attend one game this year. The open secondary market on ticket prices proves that point. And if they can’t afford to eat crappy ballpark fare, hopefully they’re smart enough to pack a sandwich or pick up a few things off the McDonald’s dollar menu only a few blocks away.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 5:52 pm
  • Also – Down with car companies and the airlines! They receive public funding and not even one thank you napkin. But they manage to foist Cadillac’s and leather seats on us? Those greedy capitalists!

    Rob April 19, 2009, 5:56 pm
  • Maybe Obama could bail out NY baseball fans? Or why not a Slumdog Millionaire competition to find people willing to sit in the plush seats?

    Rob April 19, 2009, 6:03 pm
  • Yeah, I love the the fact that the have-not’s in this country are the ones who can only afford $20 to $100 tickets to baseball games.
    America the Beautiful.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 6:08 pm
  • Rob, I am pretty sure you don’t understand the meaning of the word “metaphor”.

    SF April 19, 2009, 6:13 pm
  • Yeah, I’m the one that used an extremely lazy metaphor that has absolutely no connection to the issue being described.
    Here’s some perspective for you:
    In Peru, a primary school teacher makes about $100/month.
    In the States, a teenager can easily clear $50/day working at McDonald’s.
    Worse for your “metaphor”, tell me explicitly how many “have-not” NYers can’t afford a $20 ticket (of which there are literally thousands available to every game)? A homeless guy could make that much in one day panhandling in Times Square.
    My tickets – with a starting point of 50% off face value – still haven’t received a single bid. I’ll let you know how much the market thinks they’re worth. I’ll be lucky to unload them for at or near face value.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 8:12 pm
  • Spent the past 2 days at Yankee Stadium, so here’s my take for what it’s worth…
    The new parking system is a broken process and needs to be rethought. The River Ave Garage directly across from the stadium has changed over from paying at the gate to taking a ticket, paying at the machine and then showing the ticket to the attendant when you leave. This slows down the process tremendously on both ends. I have been parking in this same garage since I was a child and it’s never been this way and it’s never been this difficult to get in and out of. The only real positive of the new system is that you are allowed to prepay online for your parking. This is good for days like today when I left my house at 12 PM and got to the Bronx at 12:40 and still had a spot in the garage right next to the stadium.
    As for the prices…I sat in section 132 yesterday, that’s left field right behind the foul pole 5 rows from the wall. My tickets were $90, as far as the price for the tickets go I was very pleased. The seats were extra wide, faux leather and very very comfortable. Today I sat in section 224, that’s third base side, mid way up the line, 2nd level 18th row. These seats were $100, more than yesterday but higher up and smaller, hard plastic seats just as in the old stadium. The only explanation as to why there was a $10 increase was that we were technically closer to homeplate. Otherwise there were none of the same amenities as section 132. No waitress service, less seat space and fewer options RE: food choices. Not a complaint, that’s normal for stadiums, just an observation.
    I went to the game with my wife both days and on both days we ate in the food court. Yesterday we have Johnny Rockets, today we had Nathans. Yesterday she had a cheeseburger, fries, drink, I had chicken fingers, fries, drink = $36.50. Today she had a cheesburger (again) and cheese fries I had chicken fingers (again) and fries and we split a drink = $35. I did not have a beer either day, but every beer I saw was $9 and up. There may have been cheaper options but I didn’t see them. The roving beer vendors were $9 in our section, the stands directly above us were as much as $12. There is a produce stand (???) in the hallway that leads to The Great Hall and bananas were 2 for $3. Nice thought promoting fruit consumption at the game, but who’s buying a banana for $1.50? I definitely think the prices are very high, but there’s certainly nothing I can do to change that. We go because we want to, not because we have to.
    Much like SF said it’s far easier to get around this stadium than the old one (Space wise). Much more room in the concourse area, still jams up, but that’s to be expected. The bathrooms are huge and there seem to be many more than in the past (that’s at least on the field and main levels). There is a ton of stuff to do and see, it’s focal point is no longer the game but rather the experience. Food courts, great hall, Tommy Bahammas Bar, Audi Club, Mohegan Sun, Art Galleries, Museums, Yankee stores…thanks to the drubbing the Yankees took Saturday we were able to see most of these things. Very family and kid friendly. They actually have a both of kids snacks, PBJ, grilled cheese, etc…
    Overall I like the new stadium, lots of new bells and whistles, but still feels like the old place when your sitting in your seat at least. The new screen is sick BTW. I have to agree with SF’s take on a lot of issues…to me the actual building is a little odd. Lots of screens and mesh, very blah. But then again i am not an architect, to someone with a trained eye this could be a masterpiece.
    RE: Empty seats…there are a ton. No two ways around it. Full sections are empty. I would imagine they are going to have to make some changes.
    2 games down, 13 more…

    John - YF April 19, 2009, 8:16 pm
  • I don’t have much to add to this conversation, other than the observation that the wealth gap in this country is not nearly as glaring as many people would have you believe. A quick look at South America, Africa, Asia and much of Europe and it becomes pretty clear that our lower-class have more options than they ever will.

    Atheose April 19, 2009, 8:49 pm
  • Also, based on what I’ve seen here and other places, the prices at Yankee Stadium seem on par with much of New York. I go to the US Open every year in Flushing, where bottled water is $8. $36 for two meals, as John noted, isn’t too bad.
    Disclaimer: I am not a New Yorker, and am going solely off of my trips to Flushing and a handful of other trips.

    Atheose April 19, 2009, 8:53 pm
  • I can only echo SF’s arguments. I really don’t see what the relative salary of Peruvian schoolteachers has to do with anything.

    YF April 19, 2009, 9:58 pm
  • I think the prices are not bad if you intend to make it an annual event and go a few times a year. But if you’re “hardcore” and want to go more than that, it’s a bit outrageous..
    I bought some tickets off a friend who got season tickets, and they were 65$ face, plus some 40$ for the right to buy it. Lame.

    Lar April 19, 2009, 9:59 pm
  • Lar – as far as I know there were no seat license fees for any of the seats in the new stadium. Not sure what your friend’s right to buy fee was all about…

    sam-YF April 19, 2009, 10:16 pm
  • Well, I got to “check” with this “friend” again.. hmm…

    Lar April 19, 2009, 10:25 pm
  • Nothing of the sorts at all? Hmm.. Grrr..

    Lar April 19, 2009, 10:32 pm
  • yeah sorry Lar. I didnt pay any license fee for my season tix.

    sam-YF April 19, 2009, 10:35 pm
  • YF and I are in strict agreement on this one regarding the caste system the new park is imposing.
    The Stadium is a physical manifestation of this widening gap between the haves and the have-nots.
    There are have’s and there are have-more’s in this country. You have to travel internationally to truly see “have-not’s” and legitimate caste systems. If a teenager working one shift at McDonald’s can make enough to afford one game with as many fixings as his stomach can handle, then you both need to find another a cause to get all liberal guilt righteous about. Frankly, it comes off as tone-deaf.
    Yawn.

    Rob April 19, 2009, 10:38 pm

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