Who Needs Alex?

The signing of Jorge Posada comes as a big relief for the Yanks. With Abreu and now Jorge on board, the core of a solid offense remains for next season. As it stands, this would be the 2008 starting lineup: Damon, Jeter, Abreu, Matsui, Giambi, Posada, Cano, Cabrera, and Betemit (nevermind the order, and first base/dh platoon.) The Yanks scored a league best 968 runs last season. Remove Alex’s 154 runs created entirely and you end up with 814 runs—a middle of the pack number. Throw in a rather paltry 40 for Alex’s replacement and you’re up the 854. which would trail only Boston’s and Detroit’s totals from this season. All is not lost.

17 comments… add one

  • If that’s the Yankees everyday lineup next year (which it won’t be), I’d be thrilled.

    SF November 13, 2007, 9:15 am
  • I would have to agree with SF. My only real concern now is that Lowell might be in there.

    LocklandSF November 13, 2007, 9:21 am
  • They’d likely lose even more runs since most of that line-up has hitters on the wrong side of 30. But I’m hoping SF is right. I’m hoping that Cashman will be very active in changing that line-up for the better.

    Nick-YF November 13, 2007, 9:23 am
  • A few points:
    1) Is Giambi going to be as bad as he was in 2007? Last time he had a year like that, he came back strong the following year.
    2) There’s no way their 1B could be as bad.
    3) With how cold the lineup was the first two months, it’s amazing they scored as many runs as they did. Jorge will fall back, Damon and Abreu will be more productive. Things should even out.
    4) It’s all about the pitching any ways. If the kids don’t pitch well, it will be a lost season.

    NH Rob November 13, 2007, 9:30 am
  • 968-854 = 114. Will the Yankees’ pitching improve enough to make up for 11 lost wins on offense?
    Assuming that players in their early-to-mid 30s will improve over any given season is not a great thing on which to be placing your hopes, either.

    Paul SF November 13, 2007, 9:35 am
  • there is no way this gonna be the starting line up for the yankees next year. They have money to burn and trade bait too. The piching needs to be improved but even a moderate threat at one of the corner positions will solidify the offense.

    sam-YF November 13, 2007, 9:55 am
  • The Sox made up 10 games between 2006 and 2007, mostly due to the 170 runs saved on the pitching side. Still, is their pitching going to be that good again? 650 runs is an almost absurd number for an AL team.

    NH Rob November 13, 2007, 9:56 am
  • Those numbers are so speculative that I don’t think debating them makes much sense. The point is the core Yankee offense is solid. A couple of additions (likely) will make them quite formidable. As for the pitching, well, who knows?

    YF November 13, 2007, 10:03 am
  • I can’t think of any reason why the pitching wouldn’t be just as good, if not better.

    Brad November 13, 2007, 10:03 am
  • I can think of many reasons why the pitching wouldnt be as good next year:
    Injuries. Pitchers get hurt all the time some have a history of problems some develop new problems its easily the most dangerous position in the game.
    Young and Old. Schilling and Wake are getting older and the young arms are truely an unknown quantity. They could build on good performances this year or flat out suck next year, more likely somewhere in between.
    Bullpen. Also so variable from year to year. Papelbon will be the solid anchor (again assuming health) but the bridge to him will need to be rebuilt (or at least reevaluated) each year.
    Much of the Sox regular season record was built up in the first two months of the season when they had absolutely sick performances from their entire staff all at once.. I dont think they can expect that every year.
    For the record, I can also think of many as to why it could be slightly better. Pitching is just so variable.

    sam-YF November 13, 2007, 10:11 am
  • 968-854 = 114. Will the Yankees’ pitching improve enough to make up for 11 lost wins on offense?
    Absolutely. The potential to NOT have to use 10 different starters (6 of them rookies) over the first 30 games makes up at least half of that.
    I can’t think of any reason why the pitching wouldn’t be just as good, if not better.
    I can: injuries. The Yanks’ staff was annihilated by injuries at the beginning of the season, some of which carried over the entire course of 2007 (Pavano). Maybe you even count the death of Cory Lidle in this – it’s a stretch.
    And my memory may be shrouded in a fog of bias, but the Sox rotation got through the entire season with one pitcher – Schilling – going down (and maybe a week where Beckett’s finger was out of commission). That’s something very unlikely to repeat next year.

    ATLyanksfan November 13, 2007, 11:14 am
  • Your memory is indeed foggy, ATL. Schilling, Beckett and Wakefield all went on the DL, and Lester only pitched half a season.
    Using injuries remains the biggest copout for projecting pessimism for a rival club. Of course there could be injuries. In that case, the Yankees might as well pack it up and go home because they might all get injured, and they’re starting from a weaker position in their rotation than the Sox are.
    Both teams might get injured and fall into the basement, and Toronto and Tampa Bay might make the playoffs instead. To use injuries as a reason the Sox (or the Yanks, or anyone) might do worse doesn’t seem plausible to me unless there’s some significant age or injury history. In the Sox’ rotation, that applies to Schilling and Wakefield, as I see it, and the Sox did just fine with them on the DL for significant protions of 2007 anyway.
    I don’t mind raising the injury question for the players for which it’s most applicable, but it’s not very instructive to simply cast that specter over a whole pitching staff just because it could happen.

    Paul SF November 13, 2007, 11:36 am
  • Paul its not really a cop out when Brad says he cant think of any reason why the Sox pitching wouldnt be as good next year as it was last year. That is a reason and a good one when it comes to pitching. I appreciate your point but at the same time raising injuries is valid when talking about pitching, less so for hitters.
    For the record I wasnt projecting pessimism above, I was simply saying there are valid reasons to expect that their staff as a whole could have a worse or better year.

    sam-YF November 13, 2007, 11:44 am
  • Yeah, I knew I was leaving some out:
    Wakefield (1 start missed + some playoffs)
    Beckett (2 starts missed)
    Schilling (4 starts missed)
    Lester (20 missed – est.)
    Hardly earth-shattering. But point being, the two teams’ situations were miles apart when it came to injuries.
    And if you want to talk about “projecting pessimism,” I can think of worse examples than:
    Assuming that players in their early-to-mid 30s will improve over any given season is not a great thing on which to be placing your hopes, either.
    And…my team didn’t win the World Series. It’s my job to project pessimism onto the team that did. Especially when that team is the Sox.

    ATLyanksfan November 13, 2007, 12:15 pm
  • well obviously, if the entire staff were to spend large amounts of time on the DL, the pitching would get worse. I wasn’t really making that statement under the cloak of complete and unadulterated disasters within the pitching rotation. Of course things can happen, but if they don’t happen in a major way, I can only think that Beckett will remain awesome, Wake will be wake, Schilling will either be effective or replaced, and Matsuzaka will likely be better next year. Maybe I’m an optimist, but I think they will be better. Also, what happened to Hideki? Isn’t he the bridge to Papelbon along with Delcarmen, Timlin and others? Did they quit?

    Brad November 13, 2007, 12:57 pm
  • Schilling missed 8-9 starts, not 4.

    TJ November 13, 2007, 1:38 pm
  • TJ – Yes, you’re right.

    ATLyanksfan November 13, 2007, 1:55 pm

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