Categories
General Baseball

The Span of Ages

One of the things about being a fan of the New York Yankees is you get to be a Yankees fan even if you are not near them.

Which is I wanted to write about the Knothole Gang. For many years, a span that actually is quite enveloping to consider, the Rochester Red Wings were the AAA farm team for the Baltimore Orioles, the longest affilation in history to my best knowledge.

I am trying not to cheat on this, no background research, just going off my memories. I think that Rochester and Baltimore linked up in 1965. Silver Stadium held about 15k people and was a wreck when I got to hang out there because it was built somewhere around 1929 and Rochester wasn’t a place to write home about in the recession of the early 80’s. I know for certain that $10 got me a punch card where I could go to a game at Silver Stadium ten times, and see future major-leaguers stretch their legs.

I saw Cal Ripken Jr. debut there and play a few games before he went up. I saw another whipper-snapper, just called up from Single-A. Some kid named Derek Jeter who legged out a single in his first at bat, stole second, and then came home on a liner to the outfield, all within less than two minutes, but at that point I was paying full penny for the price, so I felt ripped off.

The point of this is that the place you watch baseball affects you, and not for the short term. If you care about it, the charisma and character enthrall you, and you are stuck with it for life.

Categories
General Baseball

Anticipation

I find so much art and inspiration in baseball. Not the rah-rah go *team* stuff, but when the play happens, from the release of the pitch to the reaction of the batter, maybe one out of six times, the ball and bat make contact and there is action, but for all the waiting, it is such rapid and vivid action that you do not see in any other sport.

Yes there is much more that happens when the situation is complicated, with base runners and pitchers and fielders adjusting to a batting talent, but baseball is the only sport where there is such enormous anticipation, and when that anticipation is met with action, it’s the greatest game ever invented.

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Four-For-Four

Four games straight to get to the Serious. Nah, not gonna happen, especially when this one team can only muster three hits over nine and lost the game in the second. I love to watch the Yankees play, but not like this. Bats? Yes please.

Categories
General Baseball Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Come Again

Some other day.

The senior circuit is already teeing off for their Championship Series, figuring out who is going to get really Serious.

Meanwhile, the “other” league needs more time, because raindrops keep falling on my head.

It will sort itself out today. Or tomorrow. Nestor Cortes will see to it.

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Hello, Cleveland

Here we go. ALDS, tied one game apiece. I honestly hope that the home plate ump missed his flight and they have a new home plate umpire tonight, for both teams sake.

We know that the Guardians are at the Jake Progressive Field. I bet that most ballplayers don’t care about anything except who is throwing a ball to them, and tonight it is Tristan McKenzie for Cleveland and Luis Severino for the Yanks. Here we go.

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Gotta Catch A Plane

The rain-out yesterday means what was supposed to be a travel day is now a 1:05pm eastern start in the Bronx as game 2 of the ALDS continues to resolve who gets to lose to Yordan Alvarez in a futile effort to reach the Serious. I called him Kryptonite back in July.

Nestor Cortes and his sparkling 0.92 WHIP and epic mustache faces the Guardians with Shane Bieber on the bump.

And the Tribe Guardians lead off with a bunt single. Away we go.

Categories
General Yankees

Ninety-Nine and Sixty-Three

It’s a beautiful thing, math where you can choose to find patterns, or not, and progressions, or not. But what we know is there are six days until the Yankees play against some team that has found its way into October baseball.

Categories
General Baseball General Yankees

Nearly Immortal

Alex Belth writes about the significance of Aaron Judge and his achievement in Esquire.

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Time To Move On

“It’s a big relief,” Judge said of hitting the (62) after the chase and all the attention focused on him. “I think everybody can finally sit down and watch some ball games.”

It’s time for the playoffs. Let’s go.

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Get Some Rest

Most HR in a season, MLB history
1. Barry Bonds, 2001: 73
2. Mark McGwire, 1998: 70
3. Sammy Sosa, 1998: 66
4. Mark McGwire, 1999: 65
5. Sammy Sosa, 2001: 64
6. Sammy Sosa, 1999: 63
7. Aaron Judge, 2022: 62

Playoff time. For what really counts.

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Let’s Play Two

Hat tip to Mr. Banks for saying the greatest thing a baseball fan can ever hear. Heading towards the end of the season, the Yanks are up against the Texas and took the first game of today’s double header match-up 5-4 in Arlington. Another game is on deck.

Gerrit Cole is on the bump for the Yankees while Jesus Tinoco minds the rubber for the Rangers. Judge will lead off with Stanton following him.

Baseball in October. What can be better?

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Tonight, Tonight

There will always be tonight. Trevino is on the bump in Arlington. Will this be the night when Judge passes Maris?

Categories
General Yankees

Numerical Coincidence

Now that we can get over whether or not Aaron Judge is a choker because he took eight games prior to his previous dinger to tie Maris, who hit 61 in 61 and 61 years later Judge hits 61, we can stress about other statistically unimportant matters.

Such as, during the tortuous seven-game span when he didn’t go long, he hit “only” .263 when he had to chase to find something to hit, but walked 12 times in 31 plate appearances, had a .548 OBP (!), slugged .421 on 3 doubles and 2 singles, and plated 5 runs, and definitely made pitchers change their game so they don’t end up as an asterisk. All of this under an intense microscope. In which the Yankees went 6-1 with a very questionable set of circumstances that led to a loss in Toronto. And why do we play the game?

The 61-61-61-61 thing is a fun to play with as far as it is something that happens when you deal enough cards, or have monkeys with typewriters. But what Judge has done is special, and he has handled it with aplomb. Now, back to keeping things straight for the playoffs.

Categories
General Yankees Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Sixty -v- Seventy Three

Judge stays on pace, hitting another homer off a three-one pitch left in the middle of the plate. What would one expect?

He was 1-4 in the match against Pittsburgh, so his average dipped slightly, but his slugging and total bases are better for the effort.

Today is the last day of summer before the boys of summer.. go on vacation? An interesting aspect is that Ruth hit 60 in 154 possible games. Judge did it in 147. Is that deserving of an asterisk, or an exclamation point? There are a couple other whales in the room, and the curious thing is that the first letter of their first name and first letter of their last name are the same in each case. Alliteration helps people remember what they read.

https://www.mlb.com/news/aaron-judge-hits-60th-home-run-of-2022

Categories
Yanks Gamers/Postmortems

Don’t Leave It Hanging

Aaron Judge homered number 58 and 59 on the season in a slug-fest with an obviously anguished Brewers staff in Milwaukee. An errant slider and a fastball, left in the zone, left the park and Judge had two other hits as well. As we near the end of summer, it is difficult if not impossible to ignore the magnitude of what Judge has done this season.

Categories
Awards/HOF General Yankees

Twenty One

I really enjoyed watching the way Paul O’Neill played as a Yankee. In his nine seasons, he lead the league in grounding into double plays twice, so at least he was trying to make contact, and he had a great batting average in a strike year. I suppose that I’m cynical about why this is happening.

Retiring 21 from the Yankees numbers (of which that is the 23rd number) isn’t egregious in any sense. He was always engaging as a player and an announcer, and was tenacious on the field and at the plate. But it makes me wonder if O’Neill gets his bronze in monument park, what about Chris Chambliss, or Willie Randolph? And don’t get me started on Mel Stottlemyre.

Not that it matters. Number 21 is number 23 of 99 numbers retired. Maybe they can start using decimal places for future candidates.