King Solomon, Baseball Analyst

I’ve been reading A.J. Jacobs’s fantastic new book, The Year of Living Biblically—can’t put the thing down—and came across this passage from Ecclesiastes, which seems especially appropriate in the context of baseball, and extra-especially relevant for us gnat-afflicted Yankee fans this year:

The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, nor the bread to the wise, nor riches to the intelligent, nor favor to the men of skill; but time and chance happen to them all.

That King Solomon was a smart guy.

19 comments… add one
  • Yeah, it’s a great passage.
    But YF, not to be harsh, but… uh… is that the first time you ever read that?
    I’m an atheist. And even I know that one by heart. It’s only one of the most famous parts of one of the most famous books of the Bible.
    There’s another part you might like in Ecclesiastes. Something about to everything there is a season?

    Hudson November 7, 2007, 12:13 pm
  • It’s not the first time I’ve seen the passage! But had not thought of it recently and thought it apropostworthy.

    YF November 7, 2007, 12:31 pm
  • Life is like a box of chocolates a baseball season. Over the long haul, these things tend to even out.
    To quote another great man, “Luck is the residue of design.”
    We create most of our good luck and bad luck. The trick is understanding that.

    john November 7, 2007, 4:30 pm
  • I can’t remember what athlete said it, but one of my favorite quotes is “The harder I work, the luckier I get”.

    Atheose November 7, 2007, 4:31 pm
  • “Over the long haul, these things tend to even out” is the rallying cry of the down and out!
    ;-)

    SF November 7, 2007, 4:42 pm
  • SF,is that the best you can do?
    As I wrote that, I was thinking of my friend Andres Duany, who works long and hard to accomplish what he does.
    I was also thinking that when I’ve had “bad luck” it’s been my fault. “Know thyself” and you’ll have a good life.

    Anonymous November 7, 2007, 6:03 pm
  • me

    john November 7, 2007, 6:04 pm
  • I wish Andres Duany worked a little less long and a little less hard.

    YF November 7, 2007, 11:08 pm
  • ditto, YF. Someone get that man a copy of El Croquis.

    SF November 8, 2007, 7:32 am
  • That King Solomon was a smart guy.
    And a hell of a singer, too.

    Anonymous November 8, 2007, 9:15 am
  • That King Solomon was a smart guy.
    And a hell of a singer, too.

    East River Blues November 8, 2007, 9:16 am
  • ¿El Croquis?
    ¡You live in an esoteric world SF!
    Take a look at Rem’s words here. He describes some of the problems of that Ayn Rand world.
    But regardless of whether or not you belong to Modernist Style Police, Andrés is the most successful American architect of my generation (and don’t forget he and Lizz founded Arquitectonica — urbanism is not about style).

    john November 8, 2007, 3:59 pm
  • For the uninitiated interested in these esoteric debates, you can find El Croquis at http://www.elcroquis.es/.

    john November 8, 2007, 4:02 pm
  • Andrés is the most successful American architect of my generation
    Thom Mayne might disagree with you, John!
    All depends on your definition of success, I suppose.

    SF November 8, 2007, 4:29 pm
  • Mayne’s opinion isn’t the one that counts.
    The New York Times architecture critic, who loved Mayne and hated New Urbanism, said, “The Congress for the New Urbanism is the most important phenomenon to emerge in American architecture in the post-Cold War era.”
    Duany led the 200 person Katrina charrette. He designed what Time magazine (Kurt Andersen) called “the most important development of “the most astounding design achievement of its decade, and hopefully, decades to come.” He and Lizz have won the Brandeis Award for Architecture, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Prize from UVa, the Vincent Scully Prize and the Prince’s Medal, created the HOPE VI program for HUD, reformed the British planning model with the Deputy Prime Minister of the UK, have designed over 300 neighborhoods, new towns and urban infill around the world, founded Arquitectonica and DPZ, were called in for consultations with Clinton, Gore, and both Bushes (got an Florida Governor’s Medal from Jeb Bush and his Democratic predecessor), etc., etc. etc.
    Mayne appeals to self-proclaimed avant garde architects and a few places on the east and west coasts, the third coast (Chicago), and very small pockets on the Gulf Coast. New Urbanism is changing the way America builds, and will only get more influential as we face up to Global Warming. There’s really no comparison.

    john November 8, 2007, 6:21 pm
  • Here’s a typical Mayne project. This will never take over the world.
    The big deal about his newest building is that THE WINDOWS OPEN! What will he think of next?

    john November 8, 2007, 6:25 pm
  • you guys are smart fellers,
    and fart smellers…baseball season must be officially over…
    zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz

    dc November 9, 2007, 7:06 am
  • Jennifer Lopez sells a lot of albums, but she’s a crappy musician.

    SF November 9, 2007, 8:33 am
  • Uh, “The New York Times architecture critic, who loved Mayne and hated New Urbanism, said, “The Congress for the New Urbanism is the most important phenomenon to emerge in American architecture in the post-Cold War era.” = selling a lot of albums?
    You think the Times music critic said similar things about J Lo?

    john November 11, 2007, 11:44 pm

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